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Arts and Entertainment

  • Stepping up

    The Nutcracker was a girl. That didn’t sit right with 8-year-old Tyler Humphrey. 

    Tyler, now 15, had previously seen his mother in a performance of “The Nutcracker,” and he asked indignantly why a girl was cast in a boy’s part.

    “I told him it was because there weren’t any boys to play the part,” said Demelza Humphrey, Tyler’s mom. “I told him, ‘You’re the only one who can change that.’ ”

  • Tiny Cinderellas stay on their toes

    A passel of proud papas waited inside Columbine High’s south entrance Saturday — many clutching bouquets — for their favorite ballerinas to emerge from backstage.   

    “She loves to sing and dance. And she’s always walking around on her tippy-toes,” said Dennis Lux, whose daughter, Madeleine, 5, was among 100 performers at the Foothills Park and Rec ballet program’s performance of “Cinderella.”

  • Chariots and fire

    There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • Fancy footwork

    There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • Young performers hold coming-out party

    For some young performers, that first opportunity to entertain an audience is all it takes to turn stage fright into stage presence. 

    “I’ll be honest: I really, absolutely hated performing for people. I despised it,” says 11-year-old Brooklyn Webb. 

    But Brooklyn’s high anxiety turned to polished poise when she took the stage for the first time last year in Lakewood High School’s performance of “Les Misérables.”

  • Mesmerizing melodies

    In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • Foothills launches community theater troupe

    South Jeffco residents looking for an entertainment alternative have a new option. And it’s a dramatic one.

    The Foothills Theater Company — the Foothills Parks and Recreation District’s very own community theater — debuted over the weekend at The Ridge Recreation Center. 

    The troupe’s inaugural production, “Trifles and Other Plays,” a collection of three one-act plays dealing with relationships in various forms, is in the middle of a two-week run.  

  • Rimes rocks Clement Park audience

    Maybe we know too much about our stars.
    The price for being successful in the music business often means that every imperfection and mistake will be out in the open for the public to see. The stress of fame, especially when it comes at a young age, can destroy careers and psyches.  

  • Some Rimes and reasons

    It’s been more than 17 years since LeAnn Rimes first made a name for herself as a 13-year-old singer with a voice that sounded like it was channeling country great Patsy Cline. 

  • Sunrise, sunset - in harmony

    When people from different generations discuss music, discord is often the result. It’s a rare teenager that enjoys Lawrence Welk’s version of “Moon River,” and no one bought her grandmother a Jay-Z album for Easter. 

    But an orchestra that has come together for Front Range Christian School’s performance of “Fiddler on the Roof” includes ninth-graders and 50-year-olds, and they are making beautiful music together.