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Arts and Entertainment

  • Pipe bands bring Celtic culture to Colorado

    The melodious bellow of bagpipes and the steady tapping of drums heralded the first concert of the annual Summer Concert Series at the Littleton Museum on Wednesday.

    Despite the rain, the Denver and District Pipe Band — comprised of almost 70 bagpipers, drummers and dancers — performed traditional and modern takes on Celtic marches, jigs and reels for 300 attendees.

    Sponsored by the Friends of the Littleton Library and Museum, the Summer Concert Series has been free to the public for more than 25 years. 

  • Stepping up

    The Nutcracker was a girl. That didn’t sit right with 8-year-old Tyler Humphrey. 

    Tyler, now 15, had previously seen his mother in a performance of “The Nutcracker,” and he asked indignantly why a girl was cast in a boy’s part.

    “I told him it was because there weren’t any boys to play the part,” said Demelza Humphrey, Tyler’s mom. “I told him, ‘You’re the only one who can change that.’ ”

  • Tiny Cinderellas stay on their toes

    A passel of proud papas waited inside Columbine High’s south entrance Saturday — many clutching bouquets — for their favorite ballerinas to emerge from backstage.   

    “She loves to sing and dance. And she’s always walking around on her tippy-toes,” said Dennis Lux, whose daughter, Madeleine, 5, was among 100 performers at the Foothills Park and Rec ballet program’s performance of “Cinderella.”

  • Chariots and fire

    There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • Fancy footwork

    There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • Young performers hold coming-out party

    For some young performers, that first opportunity to entertain an audience is all it takes to turn stage fright into stage presence. 

    “I’ll be honest: I really, absolutely hated performing for people. I despised it,” says 11-year-old Brooklyn Webb. 

    But Brooklyn’s high anxiety turned to polished poise when she took the stage for the first time last year in Lakewood High School’s performance of “Les Misérables.”

  • Mesmerizing melodies

    In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • Dozens of laughs

    The Foothills Theatre Company had audiences laughing it up in Clement Park over the weekend. Even if the jokes were 400 years old.

    The troupe is in the midst of a two-week run of this year’s Shakespeare in the Park production, “Twelfth Night.” The show, which opened Friday in Grant Amphitheater, is one of the Bard’s most well regarded comedies and is filled with cross-dressing, young lovers and several humorously inebriated gentlemen.

  • Dinosaur Train coming to Morrison this weekend

    A “train” full of dinosaurs is coming to Morrison this weekend.

    Dinosaur Ridge will host the Dinosaur Train, an educational event based on the PBS children’s show that features colorful kid dinosaurs created by the company that brought you the Muppets. At the event, slated Friday through Sunday, kids can have their pictures taken with Buddy the T-Rex, examine dinosaur footprints and even dig for fossils.

  • It takes two to tango

    By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Soaring vocals paired with fancy footwork when the Voices West choir and Littleton-based Adventures in Dance combined forces on Saturday.