.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • By Ramsey Scott, For the Courier

    Last weekend’s Jeffco Fair and Festival at the fairgrounds in Golden celebrated the county’s agricultural roots, and also offered a generous helping of music, art and entertainment.

    And pie. Lots of pie.

  • Eager kids lined up to have their faces painted at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House on Aug. 3, just one of many activities at the Music a la Mode summer celebration.

    Sitting on a blue chair, 3-year-old Jude Duran squinted as paint met skin. Meanwhile, Adam Duran, Jude’s father, held his son’s head still as a clown painted Jude’s face to look like Spiderman. After the process was finished, Jude looked into a mirror with a smile of satisfaction.

  • English priest Saint Edmund Campion once described the Irish people as “religious, frank, amorous … very glorious … inclined with passing hospitality,” Dennis Gallagher, professor emeritus at Regis University, told attendees at the 22nd annual Colorado Irish Festival.

  • It was 1999 when South Jeffco resident Suzanne Braden first came face to face with a giant panda.

    Braden was in China visiting the Wolong National Nature Reserve, which today encompasses nearly 500,000 acres and is home to about 150 giant pandas. The reserve also consists of four panda bases, including the China Conservation Research Center for the Giant Panda, where veterinarians and conservationists raise pandas and panda cubs in captivity.

  • England was in the throes of World War II when London resident Mary Barry went into labor with her first child.

    She remembers many of the roads were closed because of the bombing. Shells exploded all around the ambulance as it meandered its way to the hospital.

    On an earlier occasion, Barry recalled how she and her husband, Jim, were caught off guard by a sudden barrage that was so intense they were unable to escape to shelter. Hunkered down in the street, Mary asked Jim if he thought they would survive until morning.

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Unlike some geocaches, GeoWoodstock was easy to find.

    The annual event was held at the Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield Farms on Sunday and brought thousands of people from across the country and globe to visit vendors, attend workshops and find some hidden treasures. 

  • At the intersection of Bowles and Kipling, a sign near the stoplights reads, “Ninja Training, next to Ace Hardware.” Around the corner from the hardware store, people walk through a door and find themselves at the top of a flight of stairs covered with artwork of samurai. After a short trip down, visitors might feel as if they’ve walked into a ninja movie.

  • It’s a peaceful Saturday morning at Clement Park. Groups of runners are preparing for a 5K. Ducks and geese are walking through the grass. Locals are running along the path, some with dogs at their sides.

    In the midst of all this, a small group begins a game of dodgeball. Even as the players are knocked out, they run behind enemy lines and do a set of 10 pushups. And once they have a ball in hand, they can attempt to hit their opponents, who now have enemy fire coming from both sides.

  • Never was there a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo — this time featuring cell phones, city skyline backdrops, line dancing and contemporary musical interludes.

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Theatre Company presented performances of “Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet” July 22-23 at Clement Park, and will host two more performances this Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.

  • "Oh yeah. I like ice cream. Oh yeah. I like ice cream.”

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap. Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap.

    A circle of 30 people, each with a percussion instrument in hand, sound out the rhythm. Then, progressively, it evolves.

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap. Tap, boom, boom, tap.

    Each person beats out a different rhythm, a different sound, or a different timbre. Yet they all complement one another, weaving in and out of the collective beat.