.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Littleton kids got the inside scoop on bubbles recently — by getting inside them.

    Bubble Lady Nancy Winkler brought her "bubble-ology" presentation to Bemis Public Library on July 1, demonstrating how to make unbreakable bubbles, educational bubbles — and how to put a youngster inside a bubble. 

    Winkler uses everything from granny curlers, pasta strainers, fly swatters and coat hangers to create her bubbles, eliciting “oohs and aahs” from the youngsters, who don't always manage to stay seated during the performance.

  • The sound of a fire truck’s siren has drawn countless children to press their faces against the window to catch a glimpse of a big red truck flying by. 

    “It’s so neat to see the kids faces as they ride the truck,” said Steve Guardado, the organizer of the Mile High Hook and Ladder Club’s Fire Parade and Muster. “And it’s not just kids — 90-year-old grandpas want to ride up top. They’re grinning from ear to ear.”

  • Even a hailstorm couldn’t stop the party in Littleton. 

    An early-afternoon storm on Saturday left hail, branches and leaves covering the streets hours before more than 1,000 people were to descend on downtown for the Main Street Block Party. 

    Yet the mess Mother Nature left was no match for the downtown merchants, said Greg Reinke, president of the Historic Downtown Littleton Merchants Association. 

  • Reading can be its own reward. But it doesn’t hurt to win a prize for reading a book.

    The Jeffco Public Library kicked off its Summer Reading Club on Sunday with celebrations across the county. The club gives readers from preschool age through adults a chance to win prizes for finishing books and other activities, said Bethany Candelaria, the library’s marketing manager. 

  • Colorado is home to one of the most diverse butterfly populations in the country, and the beauty of that variety is on full display this summer in South Jeffco. 

    The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield opened the new Butterflies at Chatfield exhibit last weekend, a collaborative effort between the gardens and the Butterfly Pavilion. The exhibit is one of a kind in Colorado, featuring only native plants and butterfly species, said Mary Ann Hamilton, the pavilion’s vice president for science and conservation. 

  • The rain left South Jeffco just in time for residents to go out and get wet.

    A handful of people were out enjoying the sun and water at the Columbine West Pool this weekend. The pool, operated by the Foothill Parks and Rec District, opened for the summer on Saturday.

    “This is our first time coming to this pool,” said Carrie Mulholland. “It’s hot, and we don’t have a pool in our neighborhood, so this is perfect.”

    Mo Korbel, Mulholland’s friend, said she takes her kids to the pool frequently during the summer.

  • Hudson Gardens is abuzz with several thousand new residents.

    Members of the community beekeeping program installed several new hives at the honeybee garden on Saturday. The 16 volunteer beekeepers help manage the gardens’ 17 hives.

    “Beekeeping is a blast. … In fact, my family has gotten to the point that if someone asks me about bees, my family starts saying, ‘Oh no, we’re going to be here for hours,’ ”said Marca Engman, who has a hive at Hudson Gardens for the second summer in a row.

  • The long line of brake lights that snaked around Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the predawn darkness of Easter Sunday told the story for Shawna Moench.

    “The fellowship here and seeing how many people came to worship God like this is amazing,” Moench said. “Seeing this many people is great. You think sometimes as a Christian that the faith is waning. But then you see a line of cars all the way to 470 and Morrison. Our faith is strong. It resurrected my faith.”

  • About 100 people gathered Saturday in Clement Park to mark the 15th anniversary of the Columbine High School shootings. 

    The event, organized by the nonprofit gun-control group Colorado Ceasefire, also honored victims of mass shootings since Columbine, including the Aurora theater shootings in 2012 and the Arapahoe High School shooting late last year. 

  • One act of violence can have a lifetime of repercussions. 

    For most of the 200 or so people at this year’s Courage Walk at the Jeffco government center, those repercussions are well known. The event brings survivors and victims’ families together to pay tribute to those lost to violence and to survivors of violent acts. It concludes in the Courage Garden behind the Taj Mahal.

    It also gives attendees a chance to connect with others who understand their pain.