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Today's Features

  • In 1887, Colorado was among the first five states to officially recognize the contributions of laborers by creating a holiday to honor them. 

    The Columbine Courier has highlighted four residents whose daily work keeps South Jefferson County in motion, though their diverse careers represent only a tiny slice of all the jobs in our coverage area. 

    David Kacprowicz

    Zamboni driver at The Edge

    David Kacprowicz gets a lot of questions about his job when people hear what he does for a living. 

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    There was plenty of running, splashing and roughhousing Saturday at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House pool, but the lifeguard didn’t seem to mind. 

  • Colorado Supporting Our Troops, a charity that supports members of the armed forces serving overseas, is literally helping soldiers shine a light on their work.

    The group, which held a fund-raising event at Clement Park on Saturday, recently sent an $800 spotlight to an Army unit serving in Afghanistan. The light, which replaced one destroyed in a mortar attack, is used by trucks on night patrol to search for roadside bombs, said Lainey Hamrick.

    The fund-raiser featured a fitness boot camp and silent auction.

  • The lot behind The Ridge Recreation Center was empty at the start of the day on Aug. 9. By sunset, a new playground had materialized in the space.

    More than 250 volunteers from the Columbine Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including about a dozen kids handing out lemonade and water, made quick work of building the playground for the Foothills Park and Recreation District.

    The community effort was the fourth time the church has helped build a playground for the district in one day, said event organizer Kerry Schaper.

  • The price of a frozen turkey at the neighborhood grocery store doesn't add up for 15-year-old Evan Lim of Littleton.

    It costs Lim, a 4-H participant, about $70 for each of the turkeys he’s raised from chicks and then processed — a giant jump from the supermarket price.

    “It makes you wonder what they’re feeding them,” Lim said. “It’s really important for my family to know where our food comes from.”

  • The train derailment was fraught with the potential for mayhem, as pizza and Ninja Turtles sailed through the air at Bemis Library.

    But it does help to have a contingent of dedicated hobbyists on hand to pick up the pieces — and snap them back together.

    The library on Saturday hosted the creations of the Denver Lego Users’ Group and the Colorado/Wyoming Lego Users’ Group, whose members had spent hours the night before assembling a massive Lego city, complete with operating trains, a working carousel, Batman and at least a few aliens. 

  • Several a-fungi-anados gathered at Flying J Ranch last Friday morning to learn about mushrooms in the mountain area of Jefferson County.

    “We have between 2,000 and 3,000 mushroom species just in this area,” said Mary Beth Carpenter, a volunteer with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center.

    About a dozen people showed up for “Beyond Pizza: What Everyone Should Know About Mushrooms.” Carpenter led the talk on families of fungus.

  • The mountain air in Morrision last weekend was full of the sounds of polka, the clanking of beer steins and the smell of fresh-made bratwurst.

    Denver’s Biergarten Festival, sponsored by the Colorado chapter of the German American Chamber of Commerce, brought the feel of a Munich Biergarten to the foothills as a way to help celebrate German culture, said chamber President Fred Beisser. The chamber’s goal is to promote business and cultural ties between Colorado and Germany.

  • A sea of blankets and lawn chairs covered Clement Park as thousands waited for the night sky to be illuminated with fireworks on July 3. 

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District’s Red, White & You celebration drew a massive crowd looking to start the July Fourth holiday early. Despite some evening rain showers, the event drew an estimated 30,000-35,000 people. 

    The evening featured live music, kids games, food vendors and a 15-minute-long fireworks display that capped the night’s entertainment. 

  • The sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers on foreign battlefields during World War II and the support from Americans back home are the focus of a new exhibit at the Littleton Museum.

    “Littleton Goes to War: 1941-1945,” a year-long exhibit that opened July 5, not only traces the arc of the global conflict but also shows the major roles that places like Littleton played, said museum director Tim Nimz.