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Today's Features

  • Firefighters don’t have time to iron out kinks in communications equipment during a wildfire. 

    That’s why about 25 firefighters from the West Metro Strike Team were in the Willowbrook subdivision in Morrison on March 18. The team, which includes personnel from West Metro Fire, along with the Arvada, Fairmount, Golden and Wheat Ridge fire departments, practiced deploying resources to the neighborhood. 

  • Sometimes our struggles define us. 

    For Ashley Berry, a 14-year-old eighth-grader at Summit Ridge Middle School, her battle to overcome bullying was a defining struggle in her life. 

    “When I was in fifth and sixth grade, I was dealing with a lot of bullying issues,” Berry said. “… I didn’t really know how to cope with being bullied.”

  • For a group of high school students, the road to rock stardom starts in Littleton. 

    Divide Zero, winner of the 2013 Foothills Park and Rec Battle of the Bands, is promoting its first full-length album, “Reflections.” The year-long project, which the band finished late last year, has been a life-altering experience for the pop-punk quartet of high-schoolers.

  • Cows are marvelous creatures. And that’s no bull.

    The Littleton Museum paid tribute to the bovine residents on its two working historical farms with a Bovines are Divine Day on March 29. Visitors learned about how Littleton’s founding fathers and mothers depended on cows every day.

    And gave them a chance to moo like a cow. 

    “It was funny to see people mooing,” said Jade Roulston, 10, whose friends competed in the mooing contest. “It’s been great.”

  • Littleton has what it thinks is a bright idea. 

    The city has begun talks with Xcel Energy about taking over ownership of the 66 streetlights downtown. 

    Currently the city’s 3,200 or so streetlights are owned and maintained by Xcel, and Littleton pays the utility a flat yearly fee for the lights’ energy use. 

    Any changes the city wishes to make to the lights — whether it be to replace a light with a different design, use a different bulb or repair a broken pole — are limited to the services Xcel provides.  

  • They celebrated the good doctor / the only way they knew how. 

    By telling silly stories / and mooing like cows. 

    More than 30 kids and their parents were at Littleton’s Bemis Library for an early celebration of the birthday of children’s author Dr. Seuss on Sunday. 

  • A little one-on-one time for fathers and daughters is a good thing — especially if it involves a two-step.

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District hosted 100 father-daughter pairs Saturday at its Daddy Daughter Valentine Ball at The Peak Community Center. The evening dance gave the fathers and daughters a chance to make some special memories.

    And to cut a rug or two. 

    “It’s been great. I taught her to do a little swing dancing, and now she won’t let me off the dance floor,” said Robert Rivera. 

  • Littleton’s Bemis Library wants to start a conversation about race over the next three months. 

    The library’s “Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle” discussion series kicked off Feb. 5  with the first of four films aimed at sparking a conversation about the struggle by African-Americans for equality in the United States. 

  • The house had become a prison for Jeaninne Kasa. But that was before the Zephyr Express.

    Kasa, 54, has a progressive form of multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease that attacks the central nervous system. Within two years of her diagnosis in 2010, the former elementary school teacher had lost the ability to walk up and down the stairs in her home near Lilley Gulch Park. 

    “Oh, boy, it was hard. I was depressed,” Kasa said. “We went through a lot of troubles back then.” 

  • An American bald eagle seems like a strange visual aid for a talk about the dangers of drugs. 

    But for almost 20 years, Arapahoe County sheriff’s Deputy Brian McKnight has used birds of prey to start a conversation with kids in Littleton on the dangers of alcohol, marijuana and cigarettes.