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Today's Features

  • Greg Lauer describes himself as a “squeaky wheel.”

    The Columbine-area resident volunteers as a Court Appointed Special Advocate for Jeffco children from troubled homes.

    It’s a tough job, one that requires compassion, patience — and persistence, Lauer said.

    The 18-year-old whom Lauer currently advocates for was recently accepted into a technical school, thanks in part to Lauer’s “squeakiness.”

  • “Let’s go! Let’s go!” a parent urged youngsters playing in the Jeffco Youth Charity Tournament at Chatfield Senior High last Thursday.

    Four 3-on-3 basketball games were under way in the high school gym, as the youngsters played half-court in 15-minute periods.

    Fifty-two teams of girls and boys in grades four through eight participated in the fifth annual tourney, which raised more than $6,000 for the Jeffco Schools Foundation.

  • The 2015 news landscape in Jefferson County saw everything from rescued donkeys and turtles to ambitious politicians to ruthless school district politics.

    Join us now as we return to the days of yesteryear (actually, this year) …

    Turtles, donkeys and mules, oh my …

  • Christmas came early this year for one small turtle with a huge personality. 

    The reptile, affectionately named Stretch by a Jeffco sheriff's officer, was discovered along with his feline cousin, Homer, when deputies responded to a call regarding a deceased person in a home. 

    Jeffco animal control officer Chana Guy also was dispatched to assist on the call, which came during the Dec. 15 snowstorm that closed most local schools. 

  • Gerald Folger’s career as “Santa’s helper” has taken him around the world and brought him into contact with thousands of children — but it also spelled trouble for his granddaughter.

  • For Cookie, a 2-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel, the diagnosis was grim. The dog needed expensive surgery, or he was going to die.

    But thanks to the generosity of a local veterinarian, Cookie and his South Jeffco family are looking forward to a sweet and joyful Christmas.

    The feisty and playful pup has been a constant companion to the Sumner family for eight years, since Cookie was 8 weeks old. Yet Melissa Sumner knew on a recent day that something was terribly wrong with her family’s best friend.

  • The lone synagogue in South Jeffco has seen attendance grow in the past year, and many at Congregation B’nai Chaim credit the new cantor and her Southern drawl.

    Cantor Kim Harris was invited to join the synagogue as its spiritual leader in 2014 when the previous rabbi left. Since then, the Reform Judaism congregation at 4716 S. Coors Lane has seen attendance grow by more than 20 percent.

    As cantor, Harris leads the congregation in worship through music and provides insight into the greater message behind the words.

  • Santa stopped in Littleton last week and brought arctic weather with him.

    The holiday season kicked off Friday as St. Nick, along with a collection of singing and dancing elves, made his way down Main Street downtown for the city’s Candlelight Walk.

    Hundreds packed the closed street to welcome Santa and watch as more than a million Christmas lights adorning the trees downtown winked on. It was a picture-perfect winter scene — with the temperature in the teens.

  • Several hundred people packed the public hearing room at the Jeffco government headquarters on Saturday to celebrate the adoption of 26 children by 17 families on National Adoption Day.

    While the day kicked off a new life for the families, it also marked the end of countless hours of work by caseworkers from Jeffco’s Human Services Department and adoption agencies across the metro area.

  • The Colorado Center for the Blind and Arapahoe Community College again partnered to give sight-challenged students from the Front Range a chance to get hands-on science experience — by dissecting sharks.

    The center hosted about 40 students Friday for the class, taught by ACC biology professor Terry Harrison since 2005. Students who are visually impaired or blind participate in a part of science class they’d otherwise miss: dissection.