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Today's Features

  • For some, Black Friday is all about finding the best deal on a new flat screen. But for the hundreds who packed Foothills Animal Shelter on Friday, the day was all about finding a new furry friend. And a good deal.

    The shelter featured adoption specials on the days before and after Thanksgiving, hoping to place as many pets as possible. More than 64 animals found forever homes during the two days, said Jennifer Strickland, spokeswoman for the shelter. By Friday afternoon, only two dogs remained available for adoption.

  • “Yucks!” blended with yucks as the students probed the stomach contents of the dogfish sharks they were dissecting.

    “I found a claw,” said one student, as he waved miniature pincers in the air.

    “I found a fish,” another student said as she held high a half-digested fish body.

  • Frigid temperatures didn't deter more than 100 people from celebrating Veterans Day in Littleton on Tuesday. 

    The crowd gathered at the city’s World War II memorial in Ketring Park to honor veterans from Littleton and beyond. And while the temperatures hovered in the teens during the ceremony, it didn’t put a chill on the emotional crowd. 

  • New digs have been found for a colony of prairie dogs whose habitat was lost as a result of a land sale.

    The animals were on parcels owned by the Foothills Park and Recreation District on the northwest and northeast corners of South Wadsworth Boulevard and West Coal Mine Avenue. The northwest parcel was sold to 24 Hour Capital Ventures LLC for $1.165 million and is set to be developed into a medical center. The northeast parcel is currently on the market.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    After dark last Friday, Bemis Library became a monster-infested maze through which a few unlucky golf clubs were doomed to navigate.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    A group of students is making Mackintosh Academy’s Littleton campus a sunnier place.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Soaring vocals paired with fancy footwork when the Voices West choir and Littleton-based Adventures in Dance combined forces on Saturday.

  •  By Stephanie Alderton

    For the Courier

    When Dane Schley, 13, tells his friends he’s in a band, they often think he’s talking about his school’s jazz ensemble.

    But his band practices take place miles away from his classes at Deer Creek Middle School in a nondescript warehouse off Evans Avenue in Denver. And few middle school jazz bands begin their practices by playing a loud Black Sabbath medley with hair-flinging, head-banging gusto. 

  • That first sip of apple cider, savored in the middle of a pumpkin patch, signals for many the arrival of autumn. 

    The hunt for the perfect pumpkin to carve and a bumpy ride behind a horse-drawn wagon also are seasonal traditions. And at Littleton’s Harvest Festival on Saturday at the Littleton Museum, traditions as colorful as fall leaves were enjoyed by young and old.

    For the past decade, Carol Montgomery has brought  her granddaughters to the festival, and this year Katie, 12, and Lilly, 10, enjoyed the autumnal offerings as much as ever.

  • Thirty-seven immigrants from across the world stood in the Littleton City Council chambers, surrounded by their friends and families. They raised their right hands and pledged loyalty to their new country. 

    When the ceremony ended Sept. 17, the 37 immigrants had been replaced with 37 U.S. citizens.

    The story of America is the story of the immigrants who come here to start a new life, saying goodbye to homes and past lives in the ultimate gamble on a new beginning.