Today's Features

  • A sunny Saturday morning in Morrison provided the moment 3-year-old Gus Solomon had been waiting for: time to ride the train at Tiny Town, the mountain area’s enduring mecca of miniatures.

    Gus lives in California but has visited Tiny Town a couple of times when his parents have been in town. The Solomons had arrived in Colorado a few days earlier.

  • Area resident Cindy Elliott was so excited about Bike to Work Day that she doubled the length of her morning commute on June 24.

    “This is the perfect morning for a ride,” said Elliott, who had stopped at a breakfast station on the Mary Carter Greenway near West Belleview Avenue and Prince Street on the way to her job in Highlands Ranch. “We’re riding 7 miles this morning. Usually my commute is a 3-mile trip, but we decided to go for a longer ride since it’s Bike to Work Day.”

  • The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield joined gardens across the nation to celebrate one of the most important players in the life of plants: the pollinators.

  • The future of rock was on display at Clement Park on Saturday. And the future looks bright.

    The three bands that took the stage at Foothills Park and Recreation’s Battle of the Bands gave the audience of a couple hundred a show and proved a musician doesn’t have to have a driver’s license to know how to rock.

  • The staging area was packed with warplanes spanning the entire history of winged combat. A World War I-era biplane sat next to a sleek F-16 fighter jet, which shared a hangar with a P-51 Mustang, the classic U.S. World War II fighter plane.

    It was an impressive display of military power, even if the planes were only a foot tall.

  • Volunteers from across the country were in South Jeffco last week to help with the next phase of construction for the Veterans Monument at Ken-Caryl Ranch.

    The monument, which is being installed at the southeast corner of Crestone Mountain Drive and Sangre de Cristo Road just north of Shaffer Elementary School, is being built by a group of veterans and volunteers.

  • Babysitting is the first real job for many young adults — but that doesn’t mean it’s an easy one.

    Because of the challenges and responsibilities involved in caring for little ones, the Red Cross is committed to providing training for teens in everything from dressing a minor cut to performing CPR.

    “It gives the parent a peace of mind that the babysitter has gone through training,” said Glen Bernard, a Red Cross instructor trainer. “The babysitter knows how to handle an emergency situation.”

  • Disco lights and bedazzled skaters danced across The Edge Skating School’s home ice last weekend in a spring performance worthy of Caesars Palace.

    “Viva Las Vegas” was the theme of this year’s show at The Edge Ice Arena, where about 50 students of all ages showed off their figure skating skills to proud families and friends on Friday night and Saturday afternoon. The show included six acts, each set to music from a different era in Las Vegas history.

  • No donkeys were in evidence at last weekend’s rehearsals for the Foothills Ballet Program’s spring performances.

    But the tiniest dancers, some as young as 6, remained understandably confused by the production’s title.

    “It’s funny … the kids keep looking for a donkey because they think the name of the ballet is ‘Donkey Ho-tee,’ ” said Regina Smith, arts coordinator for the Foothills Park and Rec District.

  • Survivors of violent crime, family members who have lost loved ones to crime, and law enforcement and support groups came together again Saturday to remember those lost and the courage shown by those left behind.

    Hundreds participated in the 22nd annual Courage Walk at the Jefferson County Government Center.