Today's Features

  • Colorado Supporting Our Troops, a charity that supports members of the armed forces serving overseas, is literally helping soldiers shine a light on their work.

    The group, which held a fund-raising event at Clement Park on Saturday, recently sent an $800 spotlight to an Army unit serving in Afghanistan. The light, which replaced one destroyed in a mortar attack, is used by trucks on night patrol to search for roadside bombs, said Lainey Hamrick.

    The fund-raiser featured a fitness boot camp and silent auction.

  • Ken-Caryl Ranch celebrated its 100th birthday with a little old-time flair.

    The Ken-Caryl Ranch Historical Society hosted a birthday party Aug. 9 to celebrate the community’s founding, when John Charles Shaffer bought the original 2,660 acres of land on Oct. 17, 1914. Shaffer named the ranch after his two sons, Kent and Carroll.

    The event was a throwback to the community’s founding, with a barbershop quartet, banjos and a vintage fashion show featuring clothes from the turn of the 20th century.

  • The price of a frozen turkey at the neighborhood grocery store doesn't add up for 15-year-old Evan Lim of Littleton.

    It costs Lim, a 4-H participant, about $70 for each of the turkeys he’s raised from chicks and then processed — a giant jump from the supermarket price.

    “It makes you wonder what they’re feeding them,” Lim said. “It’s really important for my family to know where our food comes from.”

  • The train derailment was fraught with the potential for mayhem, as pizza and Ninja Turtles sailed through the air at Bemis Library.

    But it does help to have a contingent of dedicated hobbyists on hand to pick up the pieces — and snap them back together.

    The library on Saturday hosted the creations of the Denver Lego Users’ Group and the Colorado/Wyoming Lego Users’ Group, whose members had spent hours the night before assembling a massive Lego city, complete with operating trains, a working carousel, Batman and at least a few aliens. 

  • Several a-fungi-anados gathered at Flying J Ranch last Friday morning to learn about mushrooms in the mountain area of Jefferson County.

    “We have between 2,000 and 3,000 mushroom species just in this area,” said Mary Beth Carpenter, a volunteer with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center.

    About a dozen people showed up for “Beyond Pizza: What Everyone Should Know About Mushrooms.” Carpenter led the talk on families of fungus.

  • The Rocky Mountain Music Festival is set to provide concert-goers with a taste of the classic and a taste of the new. 

    The all-day concert Aug. 10 at Clement Park features headliners 10,000 Maniacs kicking off the day’s music and the Marshall Tucker Band closing the show at night. In between the two classic bands, the audience will hear eight local groups battling for the title of best blues, rock, country and acoustic bands in the Rockies.

  • Shakespeare came to the park — Clement Park — last Friday.

    The Foothills Theatre Company presented the Bard’s classic comedy “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at South Jeffco's premiere outdoor venue. The comedy of errors centers on two young couples, unrequited love, mischievous fairies and one man’s unfortunate transformation into a donkey.

    The 500-year-old play still elicits plenty of laughs from a 21st-century audience — thanks to the amazing source material, said audience member Larissa Packer.

  • The music of Creedence Clearwater Revival — one of the seminal rock bands of the ‘60s and ‘70s, responsible for classic songs like “Proud Mary,” “Fortunate Son,” and “Bad Moon Rising” — is coming to Littleton this Sunday.

    Creedence Clearwater Revisited, a band that features original drummer Doug Clifford and bassist Stu Cook, will perform to a sold-out crowd at Hudson Gardens on July 27 as part of the venue's summer concert series.

  • The mountain air in Morrision last weekend was full of the sounds of polka, the clanking of beer steins and the smell of fresh-made bratwurst.

    Denver’s Biergarten Festival, sponsored by the Colorado chapter of the German American Chamber of Commerce, brought the feel of a Munich Biergarten to the foothills as a way to help celebrate German culture, said chamber President Fred Beisser. The chamber’s goal is to promote business and cultural ties between Colorado and Germany.