Today's Features

  • Overcast skies and a few raindrops weren’t enough to dissuade thousands from celebrating the long Independence Day weekend in South Jeffco and Littleton.

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District’s Red, White & You celebration on July 3 at Clement Park and Littleton’s Fourth of July festivities at Cornerstone, Belleview and Progress parks drew massive crowds to eat, play and watch the massive fireworks displays that capped off each night.

  • A sunny Saturday morning in Morrison provided the moment 3-year-old Gus Solomon had been waiting for: time to ride the train at Tiny Town, the mountain area’s enduring mecca of miniatures.

    Gus lives in California but has visited Tiny Town a couple of times when his parents have been in town. The Solomons had arrived in Colorado a few days earlier.

  • Area resident Cindy Elliott was so excited about Bike to Work Day that she doubled the length of her morning commute on June 24.

    “This is the perfect morning for a ride,” said Elliott, who had stopped at a breakfast station on the Mary Carter Greenway near West Belleview Avenue and Prince Street on the way to her job in Highlands Ranch. “We’re riding 7 miles this morning. Usually my commute is a 3-mile trip, but we decided to go for a longer ride since it’s Bike to Work Day.”

  • The future of rock was on display at Clement Park on Saturday. And the future looks bright.

    The three bands that took the stage at Foothills Park and Recreation’s Battle of the Bands gave the audience of a couple hundred a show and proved a musician doesn’t have to have a driver’s license to know how to rock.

  • The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield joined gardens across the nation to celebrate one of the most important players in the life of plants: the pollinators.

  • The staging area was packed with warplanes spanning the entire history of winged combat. A World War I-era biplane sat next to a sleek F-16 fighter jet, which shared a hangar with a P-51 Mustang, the classic U.S. World War II fighter plane.

    It was an impressive display of military power, even if the planes were only a foot tall.

  • A dance studio on West Quincy Avenue is walking through the steps to a rezoning in hopes of continuing to operate in its current location.

    True Dance Academy at 8950 W. Quincy Ave., across the street from the federal prison, was granted a “home occupation” exception in 2009 by the Board of Adjustment that permitted the dance lessons if the owner lived on the property. But business owner Shelly Trujillo now is seeking a zoning change, since she has not been living there.

  • A “train” full of dinosaurs is coming to Morrison this weekend.

    Dinosaur Ridge will host the Dinosaur Train, an educational event based on the PBS children’s show that features colorful kid dinosaurs created by the company that brought you the Muppets. At the event, slated Friday through Sunday, kids can have their pictures taken with Buddy the T-Rex, examine dinosaur footprints and even dig for fossils.

  • By Cat Elsby, for the Courier

    In 2009, a group of 10 local teenagers set out to clean up the skate park at Clement Park in South Jeffco. They swept the concrete, painted over the abundant graffiti, and restored their skateboarding sanctuary.

    Fast-forward to the present, and that same group is now the subject of Nick Bruso’s skateboarding film, “The 8th Layer.”

  • Volunteers from across the country were in South Jeffco last week to help with the next phase of construction for the Veterans Monument at Ken-Caryl Ranch.

    The monument, which is being installed at the southeast corner of Crestone Mountain Drive and Sangre de Cristo Road just north of Shaffer Elementary School, is being built by a group of veterans and volunteers.