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Today's Features

  • Sunday marked the 66th annual Easter Sunrise Service at the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Morrison.  

  • The first 26 years of the Jefferson County open-space sales tax and three successful referendums at the ballot box proved that voters value open lands. In 1998 they showed how much by passing a measure that helped double the amount of scenery and public land in Jeffco’s Open Space park system.

  • It’s going to be a whole lot easier now to go out for dinner and a movie in Littleton.

    The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema opened in Aspen Grove this week, marking the Austin, Texas-based company’s first foray into Colorado. And the chain is bringing its unique brand of movie-going experience.

    The concept of the Alamo is simple enough: dinner and a movie all rolled into one. Yet it’s in the execution that Alamo distinguishes itself. 

  • When development threatened to turn their paradise into parking lots, the people of Jefferson County decided to preserve the beautiful landscapes they treasured before open land became subdivision material.

    Nov. 7, 2013, will mark the 40th anniversary of the day Jeffco voters agreed to enact a 0.05-cent sales tax to fund a program that would preserve some of the scenic peaks, outcrops, meadows and streams that define our county from the mountains to the plains.

  • St. Patrick’s Day can evoke images of green beer, parades and “Kiss me, I’m Irish” buttons. Yet what can get lost in all the noise and revelry is the beauty and emotion of Irish culture.

    And there is no better reflection of that than in the music of the Emerald Isle, which was on display Saturday at Littleton’s Bemis Public Library. Tradition, Tartan and Tears, a local Celtic band, played a selection of classic Irish songs in celebration of the holiday.

  • Art is often the truest expression of a culture.

    And just like art, culture is constantly evolving, combining the traditions of the past with new influences, ideas and ways of expression.

    To truly understand a culture, you can’t just look behind at its footprints. You have to look at the trail ahead as well.

  • When most people think of spring break and weed, this probably isn’t what they have in mind.

    A group of about 140 students, almost all from Michigan State University, were at South Valley Park helping Jeffco Open Space to eradicate pervasive noxious weeds.

    The students were here instead of the beach as part of Students Today, Leaders Forever, an alternative spring break for college students that sends them across the country doing good deed after good deed.

  • With a fire in the hearth and a pot of tea at their side, three women worked stitch by stitch Saturday to help move along a five-year project at the Littleton Museum’s living 1860s farm. 

    The kaleidoscope-patterned quilt was being created in the same way it would have been more than 150 years ago. Andrea Wilhelm, one of the women gathered around the frame holding the three layers of the quilt together, is the part-time interpreter at the museum. 

  • Scott Stanley gently placed his left arm around wife Heather’s shoulder as the minister began a sermon about the many forms that true love can take. As the sermon progressed, Heather moved closer into her husband’s embrace.

    Sunday’s sermon held special meaning for the couple as they listened with the rest of the congregation at Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church. Heather and Scott, along with two other couples, were renewing their wedding vows. 

  • Once a month, usually on the first Saturday, members of the Scraps to Treasure quilting club gather at WaterStone Community Church to create creative and colorful quilts that will warm the hearts of people in need.