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Today's Features

  •  By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    A star shined at MorningStar Senior Living in Littleton on a recent Saturday afternoon. Her name is Kay Lazarus, and she was the star of the show celebrating her 100th birthday.

    A dozen family members, some of whom journeyed from as far as Boston, joined dozens of friends, fellow residents and staff to fete the centenarian, who turned 100 on Nov. 7.

     

  • Robynne Hill played competitive soccer until the age of 12, when she developed a nervous system disorder that causes intense pain in her legs. But four years later, she is thrilled to be part of another competitive sport: sled hockey. 

    Now 16, Hill catches a ride from Colorado Springs with her mom for practices and games at The Edge Ice Arena, where she has been playing with the Colorado Avalanche Sled Hockey Team for just over a year. 

     

  • Since its completion and dedication in September 2007, the Columbine Memorial has served as a place for the public to reflect on the events of April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School and to honor the victims who lost their lives in the school shootings.

    The overall design of the monument on Rebel Hill in Clement Park, with a panoramic view of the Front Range and snowcapped peaks, has stood the test of time. But the grout in the engraved lettering on granite tablets has deteriorated.

  • The Jefferson Symphony Orchestra will soon celebrate its 60th anniversary concert season.

    And while many organizations reach similar milestones, this one is special to JSO, according to longtime violinist and spokeswoman Karen Pring. That’s because — save for a few paid employees — the group is made up solely of volunteers.

  • Crowds of leather-clad bikers held brightly colored balloons as they waited in the parking lot at Columbine High School on Sunday morning.
    Columbine principal Frank DeAngelis told the crowd that every balloon represented a person who had lost their life to school violence.

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Dachshunds and dunkel and dancing, oh my! These and more were on tap at the Oktoberfest at the Highlands Ranch Town Center on Saturday.

    The celebration, presented annually by the Highlands Ranch Cultural Affairs Association, debuted with the tapping of the keg at 2 p.m. and concluded with fireworks in the evening (rescheduled after the July 4 cancellation).

  • The new playground in Columbine Hills Park is more than a neighborhood amenity — it is truly a community project and a source of pride and accomplishment.

    About 150 residents of all ages turned out at West Elmhurst Avenue and South Kendall Boulevard on July 14 for the community playground-raising, which lasted from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. A resident DJ provided the motivational sounds, and a local deli provided the lunch for free.

  • Thirteen years after the tragedy, a father whose son was killed in the Columbine High School shootings on April 20, 1999, has written a book about his struggle to come to terms with grief and rise above the horrible events that shattered his family's life.

    "Walking in Daniel's Shoes," by Tom Mauser, is a factual and sometimes emotional account by a parent of what happens to a family when a child is murdered.

  • By Laura Bernero

    For the Courier

    A two-year study in Jeffco has identified 35 rare plants and 11 rare animal species that the county will try to protect in its future conservation efforts and open space plans.

    The biodiversity survey, which also identified one rare fungus, was conducted by scientists from the Colorado Natural Heritage Program over the past two growing seasons. County Open Space planners will use the data to help make environmentally conscious choices when planning open space areas, parks and trails.