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Today's Features

  • The owners of row after row of motorcycles parked behind Columbine High School didn’t know one another. Yet they all knew why they were at the school on a Sunday morning clad in leather, jeans and bandanas.

    More than a thousand bikers made the 45-mile ride Sunday morning from Columbine High to Platte Canyon High for the ninth Emily’s Parade to honor victims of school violence. The event is named for Emily Keyes, the 16-year-old student shot and killed in 2006 during a hostage situation at Platte Canyon High School. 

  • For Inter-Canyon Fire Chief Randy Simpson, Sept. 20 was a day of reflection as his department celebrated 60 years of providing fire, medical and emergency services to the community. 

    “I feel honored today,” Simpson said. “This department started out with just a few guys who thought we needed a fire department up here. Now it’s a sophisticated department with volunteers and equipment.”

  • On a day when the skies are clear and the winds calm, a small, tight-knit community descends on an empty field in Chatfield State Park and ascends to new heights. 

    In the early-morning light on Sept. 20, members of the Colorado Balloon Club unloaded their equipment, unfurled their balloons and attached their baskets. Soon, those left on the ground watched as the balloons and their passengers slowly floated away. 

  • The Summerset Festival was back at full strength last weekend as attendees soaked up the sunny weather that was missing last year. 

    The festival, which draws about 30,000 people to Clement Park during the three-day event, was canceled by wet weather in 2013 for the first time in its 30-year history. Yet even the potential for snow on Friday, opening day, wasn’t enough to dampen the excitement. 

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    Treasure hunters of all ages went looking for the past on Littleton’s historic Main Street last Saturday.

    Historic Littleton Inc. kicked off its third annual scavenger hunt at 10 a.m. to the music of a barbershop quartet outside the Town Hall Arts Center. Each group of contestants received a ballot containing clues and a map to the 15 local businesses where the answers could be found. 

  • Some like it crisp and others prefer their pig more pliable, but in the spirit of bringing home the bacon, downtown Littleton put pork on parade Saturday.

    “Who doesn’t love bacon? It’s delicious,” said Aaron Ehrhardt of Littleton.

    Ehrhardt and his wife, Tyleen, made the short walk to join hundreds celebrating side meat at the Alferd Packer Bacon Party. The event featured live music, drinks and several food trucks that served up the guest of honor.

  • Brazilian actress Viviane Rinaldi is making her debut at Littleton’s Town Hall Arts Center in the upcoming production of “The Clean House,” an award-winning comedy centered on domestic life — and the life of domestic help.

    Rinaldi is featured in the role of Matlide, a housekeeper and aspiring comedian who is more interested in polishing the perfect joke than in housecleaning. Set in the home of a married couple who are both doctors, the play offers a whimsical and poignant view of class structure and the nature of love.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Figure-skating students of all ages brought a cool take on the Christmas spirit to The Edge Ice Arena’s annual holiday show.

    The show is a way for students from the Figure Skating Academy to show off their hard work to family and friends. This year’s “Skates and Snowflakes” event, held Saturday afternoon, had the largest number of participants ever, with 85 performers.

  • Students from Arapahoe Community College painting instructor Nathan Abels’ class invited staff and students from the Colorado Center for the Blind to a fully accessible tactile art exhibit at the Jantzen Gallery in ACC’s Art and Design Center recently.

  • Evergreen artist Ted Garcia is a person who meets his goals.

    Over the past 5 1/2 years, he set four goals to create an outdoor painting each day, and he has met all of those goals, painting 2,014 works in that many days.

    Much like the iconic mailman, Garcia, 47, painted in snow, rain, sleet, hail and heat. He painted early in the morning and late at night. He painted when he was sick and when he had a broken finger on his painting hand.

    He even painted through family obligations: graduations, births and deaths.