Today's Features

  • Disco lights and bedazzled skaters danced across The Edge Skating School’s home ice last weekend in a spring performance worthy of Caesars Palace.

    “Viva Las Vegas” was the theme of this year’s show at The Edge Ice Arena, where about 50 students of all ages showed off their figure skating skills to proud families and friends on Friday night and Saturday afternoon. The show included six acts, each set to music from a different era in Las Vegas history.

  • No donkeys were in evidence at last weekend’s rehearsals for the Foothills Ballet Program’s spring performances.

    But the tiniest dancers, some as young as 6, remained understandably confused by the production’s title.

    “It’s funny … the kids keep looking for a donkey because they think the name of the ballet is ‘Donkey Ho-tee,’ ” said Regina Smith, arts coordinator for the Foothills Park and Rec District.

  • Survivors of violent crime, family members who have lost loved ones to crime, and law enforcement and support groups came together again Saturday to remember those lost and the courage shown by those left behind.

    Hundreds participated in the 22nd annual Courage Walk at the Jefferson County Government Center.

  • Even under cloudy skies last week, the future looked bright at Mackintosh Academy.

    The private school flipped the switch on 97 new solar panels that will provide up to 70 percent of the school’s electricity and save more than $285,00 over the next 30 years. Yet it wasn’t the energy or cost savings the panels will provide that drew hundreds to the gymnasium last Thursday.

  • A solitary candle lit the altar in the darkened church as members of the congregation silently filled the pews. A Bible reading was the only sound in the meaningful minutes before midnight.

    At the stroke of 12, the worshipers at St. Herman Orthodox Christian Church in Littleton began lighting candles, until the gathering was bathed in a soft illumination that sent the signal message: Christ is risen.

  • Hundreds lined the stairs leading to Red Rocks Amphitheatre as they waited for gates to open for the traditional Easter sunrise service at 4:30 a.m. Sunday.

    By the time 5 a.m. arrived, the park was inundated with thousands of worshipers making their pilgrimage in the predawn gloaming.

    The Easter services, put on by the Colorado Council of Churches, have been a tradition since 1947. The event now draws more than 10,000 people to the iconic amphitheater before the sun rises on the Christian holy day.

  • The Summerset Festival is months away, but the Foothills Foundation is already planning for one of South Jeffco’s signature events.

    The festival, which will be in its 31st year, is signing up vendors and exhibitors for the three-day event at Clement Park on Sept. 18-20. Lora Knowlton, head of the Foothills Foundation, said the event not only provides entertainment and fun for residents, it gives business owners an opportunity for face-to-face interactions in a digital world.

  • The Littleton Museum offered an udderly enjoyable event Saturday at Bovines Are Divine.

    The bountiful benefits of the bovine were on the hoof at the museum’s two working farmhouses. Museum re-enactors showed visitors how cheese was made, cream separated and butter churned 125 years ago.

    The farmhouses’ oxen team of Ford and Fitz were on hand, showing guests how the heavy lifting got done before the advent of mechanical tractors.

  • If the thought of sweaters, scarves and pumpkins makes your heart beat a little faster, some awesome autumn activities await on Saturday in Littleton.

    The Hudson Gardens Festifall and the Littleton Museum’s Harvest Festival both take place on Saturday. The annual celebrations of fall will offer attendees plenty of reasons to get into the spirit of the season, along with a chance to help a worthy cause.

  • A premiere exhibit at the Center for the Arts Evergreen showcases the creative talents of four area high school teachers.

    Steve Sumner, CAE director, is excited about this first-time opportunity to display the exemplary work of teachers who find time to be artists in addition to their responsibilities as art instructors.

    “They’re really worthy,” he said.