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Today's Features

  • In 1887, Colorado was among the first five states to officially recognize the contributions of laborers by creating a holiday to honor them. 

    The Columbine Courier has highlighted four residents whose daily work keeps South Jefferson County in motion, though their diverse careers represent only a tiny slice of all the jobs in our coverage area. 

    David Kacprowicz

    Zamboni driver at The Edge

    David Kacprowicz gets a lot of questions about his job when people hear what he does for a living. 

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    There was plenty of running, splashing and roughhousing Saturday at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House pool, but the lifeguard didn’t seem to mind. 

  • The lot behind The Ridge Recreation Center was empty at the start of the day on Aug. 9. By sunset, a new playground had materialized in the space.

    More than 250 volunteers from the Columbine Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including about a dozen kids handing out lemonade and water, made quick work of building the playground for the Foothills Park and Recreation District.

    The community effort was the fourth time the church has helped build a playground for the district in one day, said event organizer Kerry Schaper.

  • A motley crew mingled in Bega Park on Saturday as they waited for a firetruck to lead them down Littleton Boulevard. Several fairies took laps on their bicycles, while a couple of cowboys mounted stick horses and moseyed along.

    The Littleton Firefighters Children’s Parade drew a large crowd of pint-size participants Saturday morning. The event, part of Western Welcome Week, was the warm-up act for the Grande Parade later in the day.

    Yet for participants in the kids’ parade, it was the highlight of the day.

  • Colorado Supporting Our Troops, a charity that supports members of the armed forces serving overseas, is literally helping soldiers shine a light on their work.

    The group, which held a fund-raising event at Clement Park on Saturday, recently sent an $800 spotlight to an Army unit serving in Afghanistan. The light, which replaced one destroyed in a mortar attack, is used by trucks on night patrol to search for roadside bombs, said Lainey Hamrick.

    The fund-raiser featured a fitness boot camp and silent auction.

  • Ken-Caryl Ranch celebrated its 100th birthday with a little old-time flair.

    The Ken-Caryl Ranch Historical Society hosted a birthday party Aug. 9 to celebrate the community’s founding, when John Charles Shaffer bought the original 2,660 acres of land on Oct. 17, 1914. Shaffer named the ranch after his two sons, Kent and Carroll.

    The event was a throwback to the community’s founding, with a barbershop quartet, banjos and a vintage fashion show featuring clothes from the turn of the 20th century.

  • The price of a frozen turkey at the neighborhood grocery store doesn't add up for 15-year-old Evan Lim of Littleton.

    It costs Lim, a 4-H participant, about $70 for each of the turkeys he’s raised from chicks and then processed — a giant jump from the supermarket price.

    “It makes you wonder what they’re feeding them,” Lim said. “It’s really important for my family to know where our food comes from.”

  • The train derailment was fraught with the potential for mayhem, as pizza and Ninja Turtles sailed through the air at Bemis Library.

    But it does help to have a contingent of dedicated hobbyists on hand to pick up the pieces — and snap them back together.

    The library on Saturday hosted the creations of the Denver Lego Users’ Group and the Colorado/Wyoming Lego Users’ Group, whose members had spent hours the night before assembling a massive Lego city, complete with operating trains, a working carousel, Batman and at least a few aliens. 

  • Several a-fungi-anados gathered at Flying J Ranch last Friday morning to learn about mushrooms in the mountain area of Jefferson County.

    “We have between 2,000 and 3,000 mushroom species just in this area,” said Mary Beth Carpenter, a volunteer with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center.

    About a dozen people showed up for “Beyond Pizza: What Everyone Should Know About Mushrooms.” Carpenter led the talk on families of fungus.

  • The Rocky Mountain Music Festival is set to provide concert-goers with a taste of the classic and a taste of the new. 

    The all-day concert Aug. 10 at Clement Park features headliners 10,000 Maniacs kicking off the day’s music and the Marshall Tucker Band closing the show at night. In between the two classic bands, the audience will hear eight local groups battling for the title of best blues, rock, country and acoustic bands in the Rockies.