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Today's Features

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    There’s not much bare space on the wall of Keith “Scramble” Campbell’s Arvada home. Artwork, mostly his, covers it. Above the fireplace in his basement is one of his latest works; it’s a painting he did live during the 75th anniversary ceremony for Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison on June 15.

    Campbell and his wife, Shay, have called Colorado home since 2004. Red Rocks drew them here.

  • The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has had two photographs selected as finalists in the National Sheriffs’ Association’s 2016 Photo Contest.

    An image by Jeffco Sgt. Charlie Simmons of Deputy John Butler patrolling Highway 93 against a cloudy, mountainside sunset is one of the five finalists in the “patrol” category. And Specialist Stephen Willder’s photo of Deputy James Tucker at the Jeffco jail during a night shift in February was in the top five in “jail / corrections.”

  • At the intersection of Bowles and Kipling, a sign near the stoplights reads, “Ninja Training, next to Ace Hardware.” Around the corner from the hardware store, people walk through a door and find themselves at the top of a flight of stairs covered with artwork of samurai. After a short trip down, visitors might feel as if they’ve walked into a ninja movie.

  • Never was there a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo — this time featuring cell phones, city skyline backdrops, line dancing and contemporary musical interludes.

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Theatre Company presented performances of “Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet” July 22-23 at Clement Park, and will host two more performances this Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.

  • It’s a peaceful Saturday morning at Clement Park. Groups of runners are preparing for a 5K. Ducks and geese are walking through the grass. Locals are running along the path, some with dogs at their sides.

    In the midst of all this, a small group begins a game of dodgeball. Even as the players are knocked out, they run behind enemy lines and do a set of 10 pushups. And once they have a ball in hand, they can attempt to hit their opponents, who now have enemy fire coming from both sides.

  • "Oh yeah. I like ice cream. Oh yeah. I like ice cream.”

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap. Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap.

    A circle of 30 people, each with a percussion instrument in hand, sound out the rhythm. Then, progressively, it evolves.

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap. Tap, boom, boom, tap.

    Each person beats out a different rhythm, a different sound, or a different timbre. Yet they all complement one another, weaving in and out of the collective beat.

  • When 13 adults are playing a land-based version of “Sharks and Minnows” on a Monday evening at Clement Park, it leads many passers-by to raise an eyebrow.

    But Camp Gladiator participants don’t seem to mind — and, to some degree, they actually encourage the curiosity.

    “I’ve had several people walk up and join us for a workout,” said Tyler Kennedy, Camp Gladiator’s primary trainer for the Littleton area. “People want to be outside, having fun.”

  • Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Tin Woman are walking through the forest when they suddenly come upon the Cowardly Lion. With a great roar, he frightens them out of their wits.

    Suddenly, overhead, an alarm sounds, and an automated voice tells everyone to leave the building or call the school district.

    “See,” Dorothy tells the Cowardly Lion, “you’re so scary, you set off the security alarm!”

  • Leave for work at 6 a.m. Turn onto the road. Drop down into a lower gear to get up the hill. Push the pedal down. Now the other one. Breathe in. Breathe out.

    The first mile takes more than five minutes. The 19 more to the office will be much the same.

    Thousands of Coloradans had this experience on their way to work June 22. But rather than sitting in traffic jams, they were biking to their jobs.

  • A Harris’s hawk flew above a packed house from one handler to another Sunday at the second annual Father’s Day Falcon Fest at the Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield State Park. Dads, moms and their kids watched in awe as five birds of prey were presented by the founder of HawkQuest, Kin Quitugua.