Today's Features

  • Potential recruits for West Metro Fire deployed hose, climbed over and under obstacles and dragged dummies to safety on Saturday at Station 10.

    Now they just have to wait 10 to 15 years before applying for jobs as firefighters.

    West Metro’s Fire Muster attracted hundreds to the station at South Kipling Parkway and West Hampden Avenue, site of the district’s training facility. Firefighters put on live-fire demonstrations, displayed ambulances and fire engines, and helped the kids run an expansive obstacle course.

  • A premiere exhibit at the Center for the Arts Evergreen showcases the creative talents of four area high school teachers.

    Steve Sumner, CAE director, is excited about this first-time opportunity to display the exemplary work of teachers who find time to be artists in addition to their responsibilities as art instructors.

    “They’re really worthy,” he said.

  • It wasn’t enough for local artist Tracy Haines to create 30 paintings in 30 days. She wanted her artwork to have an impact on the community.

    Haines, a South Jeffco resident who rediscovered a love of painting after a career as a dermatologist, is donating half of any proceeds from the 30 paintings she is creating this month to Extended Hands of Hope, a Broomfield nonprofit that is working to build a shelter in Jeffco for victims of sexual trafficking and exploitation.

  • Some serious star power was in view on Arapahoe Community College’s Littleton campus on Friday night.

    About 40 astronomy aficionados attended the year’s first star-watching party at ACC — an event that gives attendees a closer look at the stars and planets without investing in a telescope.

    Jennifer Jones, an astrophysicist and professor of astronomy at ACC, had the college’s 11-inch Celestron Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope outside, and as the sun set, she turned the lens toward some spectacular astral bodies.

  • On a bright Sunday morning, the amphitheater at Red Rocks Park is filled with people working out and jogging in the seating area before an afternoon concert. As visitors walked toward the museum at the Denver Mountain Parks property, they passed a statue of a Civilian Conservation Corps worker representing the effort required to build the popular venue flanked by iconic sandstone formations.

  • Littleton is rolling out the welcome mat for 10 consecutive days.

    The celebration of all things Littleton features events throughout the city that give families a chance to have fun and reconnect with friends. Highlights include a barbecue and fireworks show at Sterne Park and the Western Welcome Week Grand Parade on Aug. 15.

    The Littleton tradition, in its 87th year, started as a homecoming party for the city, said Joan Facchinello, a volunteer with Western Welcome Week and a former executive director.

  • The Foothills Theatre Company had audiences laughing it up in Clement Park over the weekend. Even if the jokes were 400 years old.

    The troupe is in the midst of a two-week run of this year’s Shakespeare in the Park production, “Twelfth Night.” The show, which opened Friday in Grant Amphitheater, is one of the Bard’s most well regarded comedies and is filled with cross-dressing, young lovers and several humorously inebriated gentlemen.

  • The Town Hall Arts Center’s production of “Legally Blonde, Jr.” promises music and laughs — even if some of the actors are out past their curfew.

    The show, which opens Friday, is part of Town Hall’s summer acting program for youths of high school age and younger. The upcoming show, based on the musical “Legally Blonde,” features a cast of sixth- through 12th-graders, and the quality is top notch, said director Robert Michael Sanders.

  • A dance studio on West Quincy Avenue is walking through the steps to a rezoning in hopes of continuing to operate in its current location.

    True Dance Academy at 8950 W. Quincy Ave., across the street from the federal prison, was granted a “home occupation” exception in 2009 by the Board of Adjustment that permitted the dance lessons if the owner lived on the property. But business owner Shelly Trujillo now is seeking a zoning change, since she has not been living there.

  • A “train” full of dinosaurs is coming to Morrison this weekend.

    Dinosaur Ridge will host the Dinosaur Train, an educational event based on the PBS children’s show that features colorful kid dinosaurs created by the company that brought you the Muppets. At the event, slated Friday through Sunday, kids can have their pictures taken with Buddy the T-Rex, examine dinosaur footprints and even dig for fossils.