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Today's Features

  • Dakota Ridge High School teacher-librarian John Williams has been hosting a Read Across America Day for 11 years. This year, second-graders from Mount Carbon Elementary visited the DRHS library to listen to high school students, teachers, staff and community members read aloud.

    “It’s important to instill the love of reading,” said Williams. “They have the opportunity to hear that everybody reads.”

    Mount Carbon second-grade teacher Suzanne Swank said the visit has an added benefit.

  • There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • For some young performers, that first opportunity to entertain an audience is all it takes to turn stage fright into stage presence. 

    “I’ll be honest: I really, absolutely hated performing for people. I despised it,” says 11-year-old Brooklyn Webb. 

    But Brooklyn’s high anxiety turned to polished poise when she took the stage for the first time last year in Lakewood High School’s performance of “Les Misérables.”

  • In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • South Jeffco residents looking for an entertainment alternative have a new option. And it’s a dramatic one.

    The Foothills Theater Company — the Foothills Parks and Recreation District’s very own community theater — debuted over the weekend at The Ridge Recreation Center. 

    The troupe’s inaugural production, “Trifles and Other Plays,” a collection of three one-act plays dealing with relationships in various forms, is in the middle of a two-week run.  

  • Littleton is known for its genteel small-town ways — even the walking dead obey the traffic laws.

    About 300 zombies weaved their way through downtown Saturday, led by a Dixieland jazz band playing a funeral dirge, as part of the fourth annual Zombie Crawl and Pig Roast. 

    While most zombie hoards tend to cause mayhem and destruction, this band of undead stuck to the sidewalks and obeyed the traffic lights. 

  • Students at Montessori School at Ken Caryl have learned the hard way that sometimes Halloween can be more about tricks than treats. 

    A 40-pound pumpkin that the students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten had grown in hopes of raffling off to raise money for classroom activities was vandalized in mid-September.

  • One by one, the balloons joined an airborne procession above Clement Park as they floated toward the horizon. As each name was read aloud, a person in the crowd of about 1,000 released another balloon that rose and joined the rest.  

    More than 450 names were read Saturday at A Walk to Remember. Each balloon carried the name of an infant who died, either as a stillborn baby, from SIDS or from a life-shortening illness. 

  • The rainy, chilly afternoon on Sept. 27 gave way to a warm gesture of compassion, as the Front Range Christian School community presented more than $2,600 in bake-sale proceeds to the Lyons High Lions.

    Lyons, one of the towns hit hardest by September’s floods, saw roads swallowed and families displaced, leaving the community to pick up and start over amid the chaos of destruction.   

    But not alone.