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Today's Features

  • The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has had two photographs selected as finalists in the National Sheriffs’ Association’s 2016 Photo Contest.

    An image by Jeffco Sgt. Charlie Simmons of Deputy John Butler patrolling Highway 93 against a cloudy, mountainside sunset is one of the five finalists in the “patrol” category. And Specialist Stephen Willder’s photo of Deputy James Tucker at the Jeffco jail during a night shift in February was in the top five in “jail / corrections.”

  • Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Tin Woman are walking through the forest when they suddenly come upon the Cowardly Lion. With a great roar, he frightens them out of their wits.

    Suddenly, overhead, an alarm sounds, and an automated voice tells everyone to leave the building or call the school district.

    “See,” Dorothy tells the Cowardly Lion, “you’re so scary, you set off the security alarm!”

  • The gym at Columbine High School is shrouded in pitch-black darkness on Friday night. Groups of people with hands on the shoulders of those in front of them begin walking into this inky expanse where a Blind Café dinner is about to begin. A blind person leads the students, parents and teachers to their assigned tables.

    Soon the chatter of nearly 80 people seated at tables fills the room, along with aromas of the spaghetti and fresh salad placed before them, which they cannot begin to see.

  • “Hop, cross, turn,” dance teacher Joan Saliman said to a group learning an Israeli dance at Congregation B’nai Chaim in Morrison on Sunday morning.

    With music supplying a steady beat, the dancers moved across the room with fast-paced steps and turns.

    Israeli dance was just one of many activities that people enjoyed at the congregation’s first Israeli cultural festival.

  • Jimy Murphy — artist, cancer survivor, father of three and force of nature — offers one piece of advice: Do what you love.

    The ebullient Murphy has followed his own passions on a whirlwind music and film career that took him around the country before dropping him back in his hometown.

  • Call it a case of being in the right place at the right time — with the right training.

    In January, Doug Parce, a volunteer captain with Inter-Canyon Fire, was going through security at JFK International Airport in New York on a business trip to Europe when another passenger told a TSA agent that somebody wasn’t well.

    Parce saw the man, who was sitting on a bench where passengers put their shoes back on.

  • LAKEWOOD — A bevy of beautiful gowns hanging on racks and walls in the community room of the Belmar Library gave young shoppers many selections to consider during the annual Prom Swap on Friday afternoon.

    Teens and their moms gazed at a variety of styles and colors from full-length turquoise gowns with draped bodices to short purple dresses adorned with sparkly beads. Tuxedos for guys also were among the offerings.

    Friends greeted each other while checking out dresses and tuxes and trying them on for size.

  • LAKEWOOD — A bevy of beautiful gowns hanging on racks and walls in the community room of the Belmar Library gave young shoppers many selections to consider during the annual Prom Swap on Friday afternoon.

    Teens and their moms gazed at a variety of styles and colors from full-length turquoise gowns with draped bodices to short purple dresses adorned with sparkly beads. Tuxedos for guys also were among the offerings.

    Friends greeted each other while checking out dresses and tuxes and trying them on for size.

  • DENVER — The Chatfield High School winter guard placed second at the Rocky Mountain Color Guard State Championships on Saturday — in addition to being rated “most improved” by the judges.

    Thanks to new coach Travis Prudhomme, this is the first time in years that the team has had a winter season.

    “He’s done so much,” senior captain Zoe DeGrande said. “He pushes us way more than any coach I’ve ever had.”

  • Deep snow covering the ground brought the Easter sunrise service indoors at Heritage United Methodist Church on Sunday morning.

    In the warmth of the sanctuary, which was decorated with spring flowers, the Rev. Loren Boyce, senior pastor, led a spirited service filled with song, scripture, words of hope — and humor.

    In his message to the congregation, Boyce told the story of a Sunday school teacher who was explaining the story of Jesus rising from the tomb to her third-grade class.