Today's Features

  • The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has had two photographs selected as finalists in the National Sheriffs’ Association’s 2016 Photo Contest.

    An image by Jeffco Sgt. Charlie Simmons of Deputy John Butler patrolling Highway 93 against a cloudy, mountainside sunset is one of the five finalists in the “patrol” category. And Specialist Stephen Willder’s photo of Deputy James Tucker at the Jeffco jail during a night shift in February was in the top five in “jail / corrections.”

  • Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Tin Woman are walking through the forest when they suddenly come upon the Cowardly Lion. With a great roar, he frightens them out of their wits.

    Suddenly, overhead, an alarm sounds, and an automated voice tells everyone to leave the building or call the school district.

    “See,” Dorothy tells the Cowardly Lion, “you’re so scary, you set off the security alarm!”

  • The rain and lightning held off long enough for more than 800 people to enjoy a Thursday night out at Clement Park listening to folk duo Moors & McCumber. The pair played as part of the Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Summer Entertainment Series.

  • By Geraldine Smith, For the Courier

    The spring day dawned warm and clear, a perfect morning for plowing and planting at the Littleton Museum on Saturday.

  • Dakota Ridge graduate Mekayla May, the school’s IB valedictorian, sits on a bench outside the building, wearing a dark blue shirt emblazoned with the name of her future college, Emory University, which has granted her a full-ride scholarship. 

    Mekayla is looking forward to a bright future. But she’ll never forget the dimmer days in her past.

  • One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, or so the saying goes.

    Someone buys an item, only to sell it. The next person uses it, and, eventually, sells it again.

    Take Littleton resident Linda Coughlin, who was selling antiques during Ken Caryl’s community garage sale on Friday. Coughlin had a large feather Mandala dream-catcher prominently displayed on the garage siding, hoping to sell it to someone as it had been sold to her.

  • There were WACs, WAVES and WASPs. And then, there were the women Marines.

    During World War II, women served in and alongside the armed forces, including the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES), and Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs).

  • Kygo’s “Stole the Show” echoed throughout Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Friday afternoon as Chatfield Senior High graduated nearly 450 seniors in its 30th commencement ceremony. As a group of seniors performed their class song one last time, the proverbial spotlight was on, as thousands of parents, family members, friends, teachers and classmates looked on from the stadium seats.

  • Astronomy enthusiasts and passers-by alike caught a rare glimpse of Mercury’s transit across the sun on May 9, the first time the phenomenon had occurred since 2006.

    “If you look about nine o’clock, there should be a clean black dot. The ones in the center are fuzzy sunspots,” said Mike Dempsey, a naturalist at Lookout Mountain Nature Center who was stationed at Mount Falcon Park with a $2,000 telescope donated by volunteers and equipped with a filter to make the viewing possible.

  • The gym at Columbine High School is shrouded in pitch-black darkness on Friday night. Groups of people with hands on the shoulders of those in front of them begin walking into this inky expanse where a Blind Café dinner is about to begin. A blind person leads the students, parents and teachers to their assigned tables.

    Soon the chatter of nearly 80 people seated at tables fills the room, along with aromas of the spaghetti and fresh salad placed before them, which they cannot begin to see.