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Today's Features

  • Dakota Ridge High School teacher-librarian John Williams has been hosting a Read Across America Day for 11 years. This year, second-graders from Mount Carbon Elementary visited the DRHS library to listen to high school students, teachers, staff and community members read aloud.

    “It’s important to instill the love of reading,” said Williams. “They have the opportunity to hear that everybody reads.”

    Mount Carbon second-grade teacher Suzanne Swank said the visit has an added benefit.

  • There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • For some young performers, that first opportunity to entertain an audience is all it takes to turn stage fright into stage presence. 

    “I’ll be honest: I really, absolutely hated performing for people. I despised it,” says 11-year-old Brooklyn Webb. 

    But Brooklyn’s high anxiety turned to polished poise when she took the stage for the first time last year in Lakewood High School’s performance of “Les Misérables.”

  • An American bald eagle seems like a strange visual aid for a talk about the dangers of drugs. 

    But for almost 20 years, Arapahoe County sheriff’s Deputy Brian McKnight has used birds of prey to start a conversation with kids in Littleton on the dangers of alcohol, marijuana and cigarettes. 

  • It’s one thing to make a new year’s resolution to get in shape. It’s another for that resolution to last until the end of the year, let alone the end of January.

    Keeping that resolution isn’t about just willpower and self-control — you have to find a way to enjoy working out, said Tami Adams, fitness supervisor for the Foothills Park and Recreation District. 

  • Light of the World Roman Catholic Church hopes it is less than a year away from completing a plan started almost 35 years ago. 

    The church, on West Bowles Avenue at South Oak Street, is set to break ground on an expansion that will provide a permanent worship space for parishioners. The current worship space, which seats about 700, is in a room originally designed to be a multipurpose area with no permanent seating or altar space. 

  • On a day when frigid temperatures frosted South Jeffco, parents braved the snow and cold to give their kids a chance to play on the ice. 

    Dozens of beginning ice skaters took to the rink at The Edge Ice Arena on Saturday for Foothills Park and Rec’s Give Ice Skating a Try Day. 

    The aim of the free lesson and skate rental is to spark a life-long love for being on the ice, said Lezlea Zessin, Foothills’ figure skating director. 

  • Political changes from 2012 reverberated into 2013 among the Jeffco commissioners, with an opposing political view spicing debates over several key issues.

    The addition of Casey Tighe, the first Democrat elected to the Board of County Commissioners since 2006, gave Commissioner Don Rosier a sparring partner on several issues, including whether Jeffco should raise taxes and whether the county should be on the record as opposed to new gun laws. 

  • Littleton Fire Rescue and the City Council honored a local letter carrier last week with the John P. Cernich Lifesaving Award.

    Postal worker Louise Devers noticed last summer that an elderly man on her route had not checked his mail for three days. Devers, fearing the man was in trouble, talked to a neighbor, who called 911.