.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • It might seem counterintuitive, but for many beekeepers, taking care of a hive isn’t just about the sweet reward. 

    Instead, it’s born of a fascination with a creature that so much of our daily sustenance depends upon. 

    Bees, along with other insects and birds, pollinate 35 percent of the world’s food crops. Yet the number of bees in the world has dropped drastically in recent years.  

    The decline made Joanie Bock want to put a beehive in her Littleton backyard. 

  • Marie Rugg was one of the countless patriots who volunteered to help our country during World War II.  

    But on this Veterans Day, Rugg’s story stands out as special. She was in the first wave of women to sign up for the U.S. Marines when women were allowed to join the corps.

    “I wanted to volunteer to free a man to fight,” said Rugg, who now lives in an apartment at the Gardens at Columbine assisted-living facility. “I just wanted to do something for my country.”

  • Jefferson County’s Human Services Department is looking for some good samaritans this holiday season.

    The Holiday Giving Sponsor-A-Family Program matches donors with families receiving services from the county’s Division of Children, Youth and Families, said Korina Keating, Human Services’ volunteer coordinator. 

    A donor receives two lists for the family being shopped for —  one of needs and one of wants, Keating said. 

  • South Jeffco residents looking for an entertainment alternative have a new option. And it’s a dramatic one.

    The Foothills Theater Company — the Foothills Parks and Recreation District’s very own community theater — debuted over the weekend at The Ridge Recreation Center. 

    The troupe’s inaugural production, “Trifles and Other Plays,” a collection of three one-act plays dealing with relationships in various forms, is in the middle of a two-week run.  

  • As the judges compiled their notes, the costumed contestants sniffed out the competition. 

    It was a fierce battle. But when all was said and done, Leo, an 8-month-old puppy in a lion outfit, was obviously the top dog among the dozen or so canines competing for title of cutest. 

    The competition was part of the final event of the UFO World Cup Frisbee Dog Series, held Saturday at Clement Park and hosted by the Colorado Disc Dogs. 

  • The group descended on the backyard in south Littleton during the early-morning calm of the weekend.

    Armed with rakes and saws, plastic bags and hammers, the two dozen volunteers attacked a large pile of junk in back of the house. 

    The husband and wife who own the home, and who wished to remain nameless, have lived in the house for 43 years. The husband, a former engineer, had collected various items over the years that he either intended to fix or turn into something new. 

  • It isn’t fall until there are pumpkins.

    There were more than a few pumpkin hunters looking for the perfect canvas for their Halloween art on Saturday at Littleton’s annual Harvest Festival pumpkin patch. 

    “The kids love to come out here and look for pumpkins,” said Betsy Reagan of Littleton. “It’s hard to say no to the kids when they find the perfect pumpkin.”

  • Christina Garza’s paternal grandfather, who worked in a uranium mine, was diagnosed with liver cancer when she was 4. He died a year later. 

    Garza knew then her calling was to be a doctor.

  • Littleton is known for its genteel small-town ways — even the walking dead obey the traffic laws.

    About 300 zombies weaved their way through downtown Saturday, led by a Dixieland jazz band playing a funeral dirge, as part of the fourth annual Zombie Crawl and Pig Roast. 

    While most zombie hoards tend to cause mayhem and destruction, this band of undead stuck to the sidewalks and obeyed the traffic lights. 

  • Students at Montessori School at Ken Caryl have learned the hard way that sometimes Halloween can be more about tricks than treats. 

    A 40-pound pumpkin that the students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten had grown in hopes of raffling off to raise money for classroom activities was vandalized in mid-September.