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Today's Features

  • A passel of proud papas waited inside Columbine High’s south entrance Saturday — many clutching bouquets — for their favorite ballerinas to emerge from backstage.   

    “She loves to sing and dance. And she’s always walking around on her tippy-toes,” said Dennis Lux, whose daughter, Madeleine, 5, was among 100 performers at the Foothills Park and Rec ballet program’s performance of “Cinderella.”

  • The Nutcracker was a girl. That didn’t sit right with 8-year-old Tyler Humphrey. 

    Tyler, now 15, had previously seen his mother in a performance of “The Nutcracker,” and he asked indignantly why a girl was cast in a boy’s part.

    “I told him it was because there weren’t any boys to play the part,” said Demelza Humphrey, Tyler’s mom. “I told him, ‘You’re the only one who can change that.’ ”

  • Dakota Ridge High School teacher-librarian John Williams has been hosting a Read Across America Day for 11 years. This year, second-graders from Mount Carbon Elementary visited the DRHS library to listen to high school students, teachers, staff and community members read aloud.

    “It’s important to instill the love of reading,” said Williams. “They have the opportunity to hear that everybody reads.”

    Mount Carbon second-grade teacher Suzanne Swank said the visit has an added benefit.

  • There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • For some young performers, that first opportunity to entertain an audience is all it takes to turn stage fright into stage presence. 

    “I’ll be honest: I really, absolutely hated performing for people. I despised it,” says 11-year-old Brooklyn Webb. 

    But Brooklyn’s high anxiety turned to polished poise when she took the stage for the first time last year in Lakewood High School’s performance of “Les Misérables.”

  • The Littleton Museum is in the holiday spirit, and it shows. 

    The museum spent the weekend adorning its two historic farmhouses with authentic decorations used during early Christmases in Littleton.

    And while both farmhouses lack the typical modern mayhem of flashing lights and inflatable snowmen, a stark contrast is evident between the 1860s and 1890s decorations, said Andrea Wilhelm, a historical interpreter at the museum. 

  • In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • It takes more than just the will to help and the desire to give to feed thousands of people. 

    It also takes an assembly line that would have made Henry Ford proud. 

    Inside the small gym at South Jeffco’s Abiding Hope Lutheran Church on Nov. 22, 100 volunteers, many of them children, lined up along two banks of tables set up between hundreds of pallets of food. 

    Eileen Schoenberger, a member of the church, shouted  instructions before the assembly line got moving. 

  • As 16-month-old Aislynne stood on the courtroom table in front of Jeffco Judge Ann Gail Meinster on Nov. 21, her soon-to-be mother, Jena, straightened the young girl’s new dress. 

    Everyone in the courtroom laughed as Aislynne danced on the table, clapping her tiny hands to an unheard rhythm. 

    “Well, let’s make her yours officially,” Meinster told Jena through laughter.