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Today's Features

  • The talent at Foothills Park and Recreation’s Battle of the Bands made for some tough choices for judges and audience members. 

    Yet in the end, local hard-rock band Keep Kalm edged out second-place band Sunset Summer. Regina Smith, head of Foothills’ arts programs, said it was the closest point differential in the three years of the competition. 

    The concert, on June 14 at Clement Park’s amphitheater, featured four local middle- and high-school-age bands. 

  • The melodious bellow of bagpipes and the steady tapping of drums heralded the first concert of the annual Summer Concert Series at the Littleton Museum on Wednesday.

    Despite the rain, the Denver and District Pipe Band — comprised of almost 70 bagpipers, drummers and dancers — performed traditional and modern takes on Celtic marches, jigs and reels for 300 attendees.

    Sponsored by the Friends of the Littleton Library and Museum, the Summer Concert Series has been free to the public for more than 25 years. 

  • A passel of proud papas waited inside Columbine High’s south entrance Saturday — many clutching bouquets — for their favorite ballerinas to emerge from backstage.   

    “She loves to sing and dance. And she’s always walking around on her tippy-toes,” said Dennis Lux, whose daughter, Madeleine, 5, was among 100 performers at the Foothills Park and Rec ballet program’s performance of “Cinderella.”

  • The Nutcracker was a girl. That didn’t sit right with 8-year-old Tyler Humphrey. 

    Tyler, now 15, had previously seen his mother in a performance of “The Nutcracker,” and he asked indignantly why a girl was cast in a boy’s part.

    “I told him it was because there weren’t any boys to play the part,” said Demelza Humphrey, Tyler’s mom. “I told him, ‘You’re the only one who can change that.’ ”

  • Dakota Ridge High School teacher-librarian John Williams has been hosting a Read Across America Day for 11 years. This year, second-graders from Mount Carbon Elementary visited the DRHS library to listen to high school students, teachers, staff and community members read aloud.

    “It’s important to instill the love of reading,” said Williams. “They have the opportunity to hear that everybody reads.”

    Mount Carbon second-grade teacher Suzanne Swank said the visit has an added benefit.

  • There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • Sometimes our struggles define us. 

    For Ashley Berry, a 14-year-old eighth-grader at Summit Ridge Middle School, her battle to overcome bullying was a defining struggle in her life. 

    “When I was in fifth and sixth grade, I was dealing with a lot of bullying issues,” Berry said. “… I didn’t really know how to cope with being bullied.”

  • There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • For a group of high school students, the road to rock stardom starts in Littleton. 

    Divide Zero, winner of the 2013 Foothills Park and Rec Battle of the Bands, is promoting its first full-length album, “Reflections.” The year-long project, which the band finished late last year, has been a life-altering experience for the pop-punk quartet of high-schoolers.

  • Littleton has what it thinks is a bright idea. 

    The city has begun talks with Xcel Energy about taking over ownership of the 66 streetlights downtown. 

    Currently the city’s 3,200 or so streetlights are owned and maintained by Xcel, and Littleton pays the utility a flat yearly fee for the lights’ energy use. 

    Any changes the city wishes to make to the lights — whether it be to replace a light with a different design, use a different bulb or repair a broken pole — are limited to the services Xcel provides.