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Today's Features

  • Despite a rapidly approaching Christmas Eve deadline, Santa Claus found a little time for his annual drive down Littleton’s Main Street on Friday.

    Kris Kringle’s appearance was part of Littleton’s Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting. The holiday celebration, in its 31st year, raised money for Interfaith Community Services and collected toys for the Arapahoe Santa Claus Shop charity.

  • For some, Black Friday is all about finding the best deal on a new flat screen. But for the hundreds who packed Foothills Animal Shelter on Friday, the day was all about finding a new furry friend. And a good deal.

    The shelter featured adoption specials on the days before and after Thanksgiving, hoping to place as many pets as possible. More than 64 animals found forever homes during the two days, said Jennifer Strickland, spokeswoman for the shelter. By Friday afternoon, only two dogs remained available for adoption.

  • Some 29 kids were officially adopted into 22 families on Saturday at the Jeffco courthouse, and every child had a unique and often poignant history that carried him to that eventful day.

    But as the new families left the building, they started a new journey together from a joyful place.

    Hundreds gathered to celebrate those adoptions on National Adoption Day through Jeffco’s Human Services Department.

    Temporary becomes permanent

  • Students from Arapahoe Community College painting instructor Nathan Abels’ class invited staff and students from the Colorado Center for the Blind to a fully accessible tactile art exhibit at the Jantzen Gallery in ACC’s Art and Design Center recently.

  • Littleton’s new Aging Well Resource Center is designed as a one-stop shop for an aging population looking for answers in such areas as transportation and health insurance. 

    The center opened in Bemis Library in October; while the city provides transportation services for its senior population with the Omnibus and Shopping Cart programs, Littleton, like many municipalities, doesn’t have a dedicated human services department as county governments do. 

  • “Yucks!” blended with yucks as the students probed the stomach contents of the dogfish sharks they were dissecting.

    “I found a claw,” said one student, as he waved miniature pincers in the air.

    “I found a fish,” another student said as she held high a half-digested fish body.

  • Frigid temperatures didn't deter more than 100 people from celebrating Veterans Day in Littleton on Tuesday. 

    The crowd gathered at the city’s World War II memorial in Ketring Park to honor veterans from Littleton and beyond. And while the temperatures hovered in the teens during the ceremony, it didn’t put a chill on the emotional crowd. 

  • Evergreen artist Ted Garcia is a person who meets his goals.

    Over the past 5 1/2 years, he set four goals to create an outdoor painting each day, and he has met all of those goals, painting 2,014 works in that many days.

    Much like the iconic mailman, Garcia, 47, painted in snow, rain, sleet, hail and heat. He painted early in the morning and late at night. He painted when he was sick and when he had a broken finger on his painting hand.

    He even painted through family obligations: graduations, births and deaths.

  • New digs have been found for a colony of prairie dogs whose habitat was lost as a result of a land sale.

    The animals were on parcels owned by the Foothills Park and Recreation District on the northwest and northeast corners of South Wadsworth Boulevard and West Coal Mine Avenue. The northwest parcel was sold to 24 Hour Capital Ventures LLC for $1.165 million and is set to be developed into a medical center. The northeast parcel is currently on the market.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    After dark last Friday, Bemis Library became a monster-infested maze through which a few unlucky golf clubs were doomed to navigate.