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Today's Features

  • Political changes from 2012 reverberated into 2013 among the Jeffco commissioners, with an opposing political view spicing debates over several key issues.

    The addition of Casey Tighe, the first Democrat elected to the Board of County Commissioners since 2006, gave Commissioner Don Rosier a sparring partner on several issues, including whether Jeffco should raise taxes and whether the county should be on the record as opposed to new gun laws. 

  • Littleton Fire Rescue and the City Council honored a local letter carrier last week with the John P. Cernich Lifesaving Award.

    Postal worker Louise Devers noticed last summer that an elderly man on her route had not checked his mail for three days. Devers, fearing the man was in trouble, talked to a neighbor, who called 911.

  • Walking in a winter wonderland took on a whole new meaning over the weekend as people braved the frigid temperatures to take in a Hudson Christmas at Hudson Gardens. 

    The light show drew holiday revelers despite temperatures that hovered near zero during the evenings. But the cold weather was actually part of the appeal for some.

  • Story and Photograph by Chancey Bush  

    As the sun set behind the mountains, darkness settled over downtown Littleton — but not for long. More than 1 million twinkling lights illuminated the trees and the glowing smiles of eager youngsters waiting for an early glimpse of Santa Claus.

    The holiday spirit swept over Littleton as thousands gathered downtown on Friday night for the 30th annual Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting tradition. 

  • The Littleton Museum is in the holiday spirit, and it shows. 

    The museum spent the weekend adorning its two historic farmhouses with authentic decorations used during early Christmases in Littleton.

    And while both farmhouses lack the typical modern mayhem of flashing lights and inflatable snowmen, a stark contrast is evident between the 1860s and 1890s decorations, said Andrea Wilhelm, a historical interpreter at the museum. 

  • In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • It takes more than just the will to help and the desire to give to feed thousands of people. 

    It also takes an assembly line that would have made Henry Ford proud. 

    Inside the small gym at South Jeffco’s Abiding Hope Lutheran Church on Nov. 22, 100 volunteers, many of them children, lined up along two banks of tables set up between hundreds of pallets of food. 

    Eileen Schoenberger, a member of the church, shouted  instructions before the assembly line got moving. 

  • As 16-month-old Aislynne stood on the courtroom table in front of Jeffco Judge Ann Gail Meinster on Nov. 21, her soon-to-be mother, Jena, straightened the young girl’s new dress. 

    Everyone in the courtroom laughed as Aislynne danced on the table, clapping her tiny hands to an unheard rhythm. 

    “Well, let’s make her yours officially,” Meinster told Jena through laughter. 

  • Some people define success not by the presence of monetary gain but by the absence of constraints — in other words, the freedom to pursue their dreams. 

    For Todd McFarlane, legendary comic book creator and owner of McFarlane Toys, success has meant the freedom to work without the constraints of others’ limitations. 

  • It might seem counterintuitive, but for many beekeepers, taking care of a hive isn’t just about the sweet reward. 

    Instead, it’s born of a fascination with a creature that so much of our daily sustenance depends upon. 

    Bees, along with other insects and birds, pollinate 35 percent of the world’s food crops. Yet the number of bees in the world has dropped drastically in recent years.  

    The decline made Joanie Bock want to put a beehive in her Littleton backyard.