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Today's Features

  • About 100 people gathered Saturday in Clement Park to mark the 15th anniversary of the Columbine High School shootings. 

    The event, organized by the nonprofit gun-control group Colorado Ceasefire, also honored victims of mass shootings since Columbine, including the Aurora theater shootings in 2012 and the Arapahoe High School shooting late last year. 

  • The long line of brake lights that snaked around Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the predawn darkness of Easter Sunday told the story for Shawna Moench.

    “The fellowship here and seeing how many people came to worship God like this is amazing,” Moench said. “Seeing this many people is great. You think sometimes as a Christian that the faith is waning. But then you see a line of cars all the way to 470 and Morrison. Our faith is strong. It resurrected my faith.”

  • One act of violence can have a lifetime of repercussions. 

    For most of the 200 or so people at this year’s Courage Walk at the Jeffco government center, those repercussions are well known. The event brings survivors and victims’ families together to pay tribute to those lost to violence and to survivors of violent acts. It concludes in the Courage Garden behind the Taj Mahal.

    It also gives attendees a chance to connect with others who understand their pain. 

  • Dakota Ridge High School teacher-librarian John Williams has been hosting a Read Across America Day for 11 years. This year, second-graders from Mount Carbon Elementary visited the DRHS library to listen to high school students, teachers, staff and community members read aloud.

    “It’s important to instill the love of reading,” said Williams. “They have the opportunity to hear that everybody reads.”

    Mount Carbon second-grade teacher Suzanne Swank said the visit has an added benefit.

  • There’s something to be said for following a childhood dream into adulthood — especially when that dream involves horses, acrobatics, sword fighting, chariot races and fire.

    The cast of “Gladius,” which is in the middle of a six-week run at the Jeffco Fairgrounds, lives that dream every time they take the stage. 

  • Firefighters don’t have time to iron out kinks in communications equipment during a wildfire. 

    That’s why about 25 firefighters from the West Metro Strike Team were in the Willowbrook subdivision in Morrison on March 18. The team, which includes personnel from West Metro Fire, along with the Arvada, Fairmount, Golden and Wheat Ridge fire departments, practiced deploying resources to the neighborhood. 

  • Cows are marvelous creatures. And that’s no bull.

    The Littleton Museum paid tribute to the bovine residents on its two working historical farms with a Bovines are Divine Day on March 29. Visitors learned about how Littleton’s founding fathers and mothers depended on cows every day.

    And gave them a chance to moo like a cow. 

    “It was funny to see people mooing,” said Jade Roulston, 10, whose friends competed in the mooing contest. “It’s been great.”

  • Sometimes our struggles define us. 

    For Ashley Berry, a 14-year-old eighth-grader at Summit Ridge Middle School, her battle to overcome bullying was a defining struggle in her life. 

    “When I was in fifth and sixth grade, I was dealing with a lot of bullying issues,” Berry said. “… I didn’t really know how to cope with being bullied.”

  • There’s no need to move your arms when your feet are this fast. But smiling is encouraged. 

    A group of performers from McTeggart Irish Dancers, an academy with a school in south Littleton, danced a few jigs Sunday at Bemis Library to ring in St. Patrick’s Day a little early. 

    While Irish dancing is known for fancy footwork but not a lot of upper-body movement, teacher Anne Babcock said Irish dancers have to use their entire bodies to perform the fast moves and high kicks featured in the traditional dance. 

  • For a group of high school students, the road to rock stardom starts in Littleton. 

    Divide Zero, winner of the 2013 Foothills Park and Rec Battle of the Bands, is promoting its first full-length album, “Reflections.” The year-long project, which the band finished late last year, has been a life-altering experience for the pop-punk quartet of high-schoolers.