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Today's Features

  • The Colorado Center for the Blind and Arapahoe Community College again partnered to give sight-challenged students from the Front Range a chance to get hands-on science experience — by dissecting sharks.

    The center hosted about 40 students Friday for the class, taught by ACC biology professor Terry Harrison since 2005. Students who are visually impaired or blind participate in a part of science class they’d otherwise miss: dissection.

  • The men gathered around a flatbed truck, handing out seven old but well-maintained M-1 rifles and clips of blank ammunition.

    The 11 men from the Pat Hannon Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4666 in Littleton, some in their 80s, then walked to a shelter at Fort Logan National Cemetery on Nov. 6. They positioned themselves as they had a thousand times before and waited for the funeral party to arrive.

  • After months of fund-raising and work by volunteers from across the country, the Veterans Monument at Ken-Caryl Ranch was officially presented to the community on Saturday, just in time for Veterans Day.

  • On Friday, the Foothills Park and Recreation District will give residents a chance to try several classes that focus on the connection between mind and body.

    Foothills will open up its yoga, tai chi, Pilates reformer and barre revolution classes for 20-minutes sessions. The free day lets residents sample different ways to exercise, said Tami Adams-Schlieman, fitness supervisor for Foothills.

  • Rebels Without Applause, Columbine High’s drama group, is set to premiere “Nooses Off” by Don Zolidis on Thursday in the school’s auditorium.

  • A delegation of citizen ambassadors is set to travel to Littleton’s sister city — Bega, Australia — in 2016, and the group is seeking more members.

    More than 20 people have signed up to make the 9,000-mile journey to the southeast coast of Australia and the Bega Valley. For most of the trip, set to depart March 18 and return April 4, the citizen ambassadors will stay with Bega residents and get a glimpse of their everyday lives.

  • Most pumpkin patches don’t come with an obstacle course.

    Thousands descended on the Botanical Gardens at Chatfield on Saturday for the annual Great Pumpkin Haul, a 2-mile obstacle course in which each competitor carries a pumpkin — or two pumpkins, for the more extreme athletes.

    And if carrying a pumpkin or two while climbing over a wall or through a tunnel isn’t hard enough, many participants were decked out in Halloween costumes as well.

  • I’m a legitimate Star Wars geek.

    That isn’t an exaggeration. I grew up immersed in the universe George Lucas created in “Star Wars,” “The Empire Strikes Back” and “Return of the Jedi.” I memorized every line from repeated viewings of all three movies. And I still watch them on a regular basis today.

    I’m a grown man who displays a light saber on his wall next to a poster from the original film. I’ve acted in a Star Wars fan film. I am a legitimate Star Wars geek.

  • More than 20 million pet owners across the country will dress up their pets this Halloween, according to a report released by the National Retail Federation. With more than $350 million forecast to be spent on pet costumes in 2015, there will be no shortage of dressed-up pets hitting social media and online photo contests, including Deer Creek Animal Hospital in South Jeffco.

  • Members of the Columbine chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution are paying tribute to their ancestors’ military service by welcoming home the soldiers who serve today.

    The local members, along with 22 DAR chapters in Colorado, have been collecting everything from new sheets and pillows to toilet paper and food from the community, said Jewel Wellborn, a Ken-Caryl resident and the Columbine chapter’s regent.