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Today's Features

  • Story and Photograph by Chancey Bush  

    As the sun set behind the mountains, darkness settled over downtown Littleton — but not for long. More than 1 million twinkling lights illuminated the trees and the glowing smiles of eager youngsters waiting for an early glimpse of Santa Claus.

    The holiday spirit swept over Littleton as thousands gathered downtown on Friday night for the 30th annual Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting tradition. 

  • The Littleton Museum is in the holiday spirit, and it shows. 

    The museum spent the weekend adorning its two historic farmhouses with authentic decorations used during early Christmases in Littleton.

    And while both farmhouses lack the typical modern mayhem of flashing lights and inflatable snowmen, a stark contrast is evident between the 1860s and 1890s decorations, said Andrea Wilhelm, a historical interpreter at the museum. 

  • In a handbell choir, the musicians use their hands, mallets and bodies to modify sounds from the single-note instruments, creating a rich tapestry of sounds. 

  • It takes more than just the will to help and the desire to give to feed thousands of people. 

    It also takes an assembly line that would have made Henry Ford proud. 

    Inside the small gym at South Jeffco’s Abiding Hope Lutheran Church on Nov. 22, 100 volunteers, many of them children, lined up along two banks of tables set up between hundreds of pallets of food. 

    Eileen Schoenberger, a member of the church, shouted  instructions before the assembly line got moving. 

  • As 16-month-old Aislynne stood on the courtroom table in front of Jeffco Judge Ann Gail Meinster on Nov. 21, her soon-to-be mother, Jena, straightened the young girl’s new dress. 

    Everyone in the courtroom laughed as Aislynne danced on the table, clapping her tiny hands to an unheard rhythm. 

    “Well, let’s make her yours officially,” Meinster told Jena through laughter. 

  • Some people define success not by the presence of monetary gain but by the absence of constraints — in other words, the freedom to pursue their dreams. 

    For Todd McFarlane, legendary comic book creator and owner of McFarlane Toys, success has meant the freedom to work without the constraints of others’ limitations. 

  • It might seem counterintuitive, but for many beekeepers, taking care of a hive isn’t just about the sweet reward. 

    Instead, it’s born of a fascination with a creature that so much of our daily sustenance depends upon. 

    Bees, along with other insects and birds, pollinate 35 percent of the world’s food crops. Yet the number of bees in the world has dropped drastically in recent years.  

    The decline made Joanie Bock want to put a beehive in her Littleton backyard. 

  • Marie Rugg was one of the countless patriots who volunteered to help our country during World War II.  

    But on this Veterans Day, Rugg’s story stands out as special. She was in the first wave of women to sign up for the U.S. Marines when women were allowed to join the corps.

    “I wanted to volunteer to free a man to fight,” said Rugg, who now lives in an apartment at the Gardens at Columbine assisted-living facility. “I just wanted to do something for my country.”

  • Jefferson County’s Human Services Department is looking for some good samaritans this holiday season.

    The Holiday Giving Sponsor-A-Family Program matches donors with families receiving services from the county’s Division of Children, Youth and Families, said Korina Keating, Human Services’ volunteer coordinator. 

    A donor receives two lists for the family being shopped for —  one of needs and one of wants, Keating said. 

  • South Jeffco residents looking for an entertainment alternative have a new option. And it’s a dramatic one.

    The Foothills Theater Company — the Foothills Parks and Recreation District’s very own community theater — debuted over the weekend at The Ridge Recreation Center. 

    The troupe’s inaugural production, “Trifles and Other Plays,” a collection of three one-act plays dealing with relationships in various forms, is in the middle of a two-week run.