Today's Features

  • A group of military veterans who had geared up in South Jeffco spent last week at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park.

    The dozen veterans from across the country were at the Sports Authority at Bowles Crossing on March 10 to load up on everything from wool socks to ski goggles before making the trip up the mountain to participate in numerous winter sports.

  • A two-day-long party? Yes, marking 125 years might just be worthy of such an extended fete.

    Littleton celebrated the 125th anniversary of its founding over the weekend with a two-day celebration that included a fireworks show and the opening of a new trail along the city’s historic ditch.

    And to mark the quasquicentennial of Littleton becoming an official town, Gov. John Hickenlooper last week proclaimed March 8 as City of Littleton Day. Not bad for a little town that started with only 245 residents 125 years ago.

  • Ernest the donkey’s journey to his new home in Littleton was long and difficult.

    The 6-year-old donkey is the newest resident of the Littleton Museum’s 1860s working farmhouse. He joins another museum resident, Kate the mule, and will eventually be integrated into the farm’s daily activities, said Suellen Winstead, the museum’s education and interpretation coordinator.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Denim, fanny packs, scrunchies and smiling faces filled Stepping Stone Support Center’s facility on a recent Saturday for a ‘90s-themed dance party.

  • The Foothills Park and Rec District will host its first-ever job fair on Saturday for potential employees looking for seasonal or part-time work later this year.

    Foothills has openings for seasonal and part-time employees in aquatics, golf course and parks maintenance, children’s programs, and front-desk staffing, said Wenonah Macdonald, the district’s human resources administrator.

  • Zombies typically aren’t soft or cute, but the creatures being created by teens recently at the Columbine Library inspired more quacking than quaking.

    At the library’s Zombie Felties program on Feb. 10, one of its monthly events for teenagers, ducks, lions and other felines were made from felt and a lot of energetic creativity.

  • It was hard to tell who was having a better time on the dance floor: the proud fathers or the beaming daughters.

    Foothills Park and Rec’s Daddy Daughter Valentine Ball on Saturday drew a crowd of fathers who wanted to make memories with their daughters — and to impart some important lessons.

  • Littleton’s Town Hall Arts Center is set to open “Next to Normal,” a Tony- and Pulitzer-winning musical about one family’s struggles with mental illness.

    The rock musical, which opens Friday, takes a frank yet sensitive look at how one mother’s bipolar disorder affects her and her family. The musical’s ability to deal with such a specific topic in a way that anyone can relate to makes it a powerful piece of art, said director Nick Sugar.

  • Firefighters are trained to deal with physical trauma. Ambulances and fire engines are equipped with medical tools that can treat everything from broken bones to heart attacks.

    But when it comes to mental trauma, like suicide attempts, first responders often are without any applicable tools or training. That led Littleton Fire Rescue Division Chief Wayne Zygowicz to develop a set of procedures for first responders to deal with suicidal patients and with family members.

  • Brazilian actress Viviane Rinaldi is making her debut at Littleton’s Town Hall Arts Center in the upcoming production of “The Clean House,” an award-winning comedy centered on domestic life — and the life of domestic help.

    Rinaldi is featured in the role of Matlide, a housekeeper and aspiring comedian who is more interested in polishing the perfect joke than in housecleaning. Set in the home of a married couple who are both doctors, the play offers a whimsical and poignant view of class structure and the nature of love.