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Today's Features

  • Dakota Ridge graduate Mekayla May, the school’s IB valedictorian, sits on a bench outside the building, wearing a dark blue shirt emblazoned with the name of her future college, Emory University, which has granted her a full-ride scholarship. 

    Mekayla is looking forward to a bright future. But she’ll never forget the dimmer days in her past.

  • One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, or so the saying goes.

    Someone buys an item, only to sell it. The next person uses it, and, eventually, sells it again.

    Take Littleton resident Linda Coughlin, who was selling antiques during Ken Caryl’s community garage sale on Friday. Coughlin had a large feather Mandala dream-catcher prominently displayed on the garage siding, hoping to sell it to someone as it had been sold to her.

  • There were WACs, WAVES and WASPs. And then, there were the women Marines.

    During World War II, women served in and alongside the armed forces, including the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES), and Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs).

  • Kygo’s “Stole the Show” echoed throughout Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Friday afternoon as Chatfield Senior High graduated nearly 450 seniors in its 30th commencement ceremony. As a group of seniors performed their class song one last time, the proverbial spotlight was on, as thousands of parents, family members, friends, teachers and classmates looked on from the stadium seats.

  • Astronomy enthusiasts and passers-by alike caught a rare glimpse of Mercury’s transit across the sun on May 9, the first time the phenomenon had occurred since 2006.

    “If you look about nine o’clock, there should be a clean black dot. The ones in the center are fuzzy sunspots,” said Mike Dempsey, a naturalist at Lookout Mountain Nature Center who was stationed at Mount Falcon Park with a $2,000 telescope donated by volunteers and equipped with a filter to make the viewing possible.

  • The gym at Columbine High School is shrouded in pitch-black darkness on Friday night. Groups of people with hands on the shoulders of those in front of them begin walking into this inky expanse where a Blind Café dinner is about to begin. A blind person leads the students, parents and teachers to their assigned tables.

    Soon the chatter of nearly 80 people seated at tables fills the room, along with aromas of the spaghetti and fresh salad placed before them, which they cannot begin to see.

  • The lyrics of a song performed by the Family Dog String Band at Saturday’s Alley Fest in Morrison couldn’t have been more apt: “Let it rain, let it pour … I’ve got the deep alley blues.”

    The bluegrass band from Eldora was one of several musical groups that set up under canopies and played outdoors as drizzling rain fell.

  • “Hop, cross, turn,” dance teacher Joan Saliman said to a group learning an Israeli dance at Congregation B’nai Chaim in Morrison on Sunday morning.

    With music supplying a steady beat, the dancers moved across the room with fast-paced steps and turns.

    Israeli dance was just one of many activities that people enjoyed at the congregation’s first Israeli cultural festival.

  • Jimy Murphy — artist, cancer survivor, father of three and force of nature — offers one piece of advice: Do what you love.

    The ebullient Murphy has followed his own passions on a whirlwind music and film career that took him around the country before dropping him back in his hometown.

  • Call it a case of being in the right place at the right time — with the right training.

    In January, Doug Parce, a volunteer captain with Inter-Canyon Fire, was going through security at JFK International Airport in New York on a business trip to Europe when another passenger told a TSA agent that somebody wasn’t well.

    Parce saw the man, who was sitting on a bench where passengers put their shoes back on.