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Today's Features

  • LONG Building Technologies Inc. announces its headquarters building at 5001 S. Zuni St. in Littleton was recently awarded LEED (for commercial interiors) Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.
    The LEED rating system, developed by the council, is the internationally accepted standard for energy efficient, sustainable and high performing buildings, and provides building owners a framework for designing and implementing green building design and operations. Gold is the second highest in LEED’s four levels of certification.

  • Holden Wiens, a photography major from Littleton, was named to the dean’s list for the spring semester at Columbia College Chicago. To be named to the dean’s list, students must have taken at least 12 credit hours and have a 3.75 grade-point average or higher for that semester.

  • Benjamin Kane of Littleton was named to the dean’s list at Tufts University. To be named to the dean’s list, a student must earn a semester grade-point average of 3.4 or greater.

  • James Mitton of Littleton earned a bachelor’s degree  in transformational leadership from Bethel University in St. Paul, Minn., this spring. He is the son of Paul and Janelle Mitton of Littleton.

  • Kurt and Tammy Wells of Ken-Caryl Ranch announce the engagement of their daughter, Kara Wells, to Daniel Hansen of Englewood, the son of Gary and Susy Tournor and Chris Hansen of Grand Island, Neb.

    The couple will marry on Aug. 23 at Terrace Gardens.

  • Some families you’re born into, bound to each other by blood.

    Others you earn your way into with blood, sweat and sacrifice.

    After 20 grueling weeks of training, testing and a lot of pushups, 25 new members were welcomed into the metro area’s firefighting family on Friday when they earned their badges. 

    The new firefighters will work at the Littleton, West Metro, South Metro and Cunningham fire departments.

  • It just doesn’t feel like the Fourth of July without a big, colorful fireworks display. 

    Especially if you’re the one putting on the show.

    “This is our Fourth of July. Some people have barbecues — we shoot fireworks,” said Les Nack, a member of the Western Enterprises Inc. crew that was responsible for Littleton’s 21-minute-long fireworks display to cap the city’s July Fourth celebration. “I think you have to have a little firebug in you to do this job.”

  • The superhero team had become one with the mud.

    Spider-Man, Batman, Iron Man and Wonder Woman were covered in muck as they crawled across the finish line. 

    “I’m not Wonder Woman,” Amanda Carlson corrected as she pointed to her chest. “I’m Supergirl.”

    Carlson’s Supergirl insignia was barely distinguishable because of the thick layer of ooze she had accumulated over the 5-kilometer course. Only her bright red boots somehow managed to maintain their luster. 

  • Having modern conveniences in the kitchen doesn't always translate into doing less work. 

    Just ask a woman trying to cook her family a meal in the 1890s.

    "Industrialization made it harder for women," said Kathie Owens-Tucker, an interpreter at the 1890s farmhouse in the Littleton Museum. "We were expected to do more with all the new modern conveniences."

  • The Littleton Museum offered a free course for children in the 1860s cabin on Saturday, where they learned how butter was made in the olden days.

    They also learned how the pioneers kept butter fresh without refrigeration and were able to taste the results of their efforts.