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Today's Features

  • The rainy, chilly afternoon on Sept. 27 gave way to a warm gesture of compassion, as the Front Range Christian School community presented more than $2,600 in bake-sale proceeds to the Lyons High Lions.

    Lyons, one of the towns hit hardest by September’s floods, saw roads swallowed and families displaced, leaving the community to pick up and start over amid the chaos of destruction.   

    But not alone.

  • The important thing is not to panic. And to remember that you won’t starve to death. 

    Because you’re surrounded by corn. 

    The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield has laid out a perplexing course for its corn maze this year, the 14th installment of the popular populist puzzle. The labyrinth is spread out over 8 acres of maize, and hints are sprinkled throughout.

    “Follow the hints; they’re really helpful,” said volunteer Dale Huffner. “Of course, that’s unless you want to get lost in there.”

  • A fly fisherman who’d been working a river at Eldorado Canyon State Park watched a group of beginner climbers slowly work their way up the rock as he walked back to his truck. 

    “Are those kids blind?” he exclaimed.

    Of the dozen and a half people on the four established climbing routes, almost all were visually impaired. The climbers were students of the independence training program at the Colorado Center for the Blind in Littleton. 

  • The Army Corps of Engineers has released its final plan for the expansion of Chatfield Reservoir, a proposal designed to help meet growing demands for water but one that is still opposed by at least one conservation group.

    The chosen plan, labeled Alternative 3, would raise the water levels by a maximum of 12 feet and increase the maximum storage by 20,600 acre-feet. Some 587 acres of Chatfield State Park, Colorado’s most popular, would be flooded in peak storage years to provide more water for urban and agricultural users on the Front Range.

  • When a young person makes that first long sojourn away from home, it's often a challenge to know what to bring along.
    But it always makes sense to bring an appetite.

  • Maybe we know too much about our stars.
    The price for being successful in the music business often means that every imperfection and mistake will be out in the open for the public to see. The stress of fame, especially when it comes at a young age, can destroy careers and psyches.  

  • Littleton has a lot to offer.
    And most of it is on display this week as Western Welcome Week gets into full swing.

  • It’s been more than 17 years since LeAnn Rimes first made a name for herself as a 13-year-old singer with a voice that sounded like it was channeling country great Patsy Cline. 

  • Music is freedom. 

    Music can mean freedom from the pain and misery of a broken heart, or the feeling of freedom that new love brings. 

    For Donavan Ariza, 16, music has meant freedom from the stress, pain and loneliness of fighting cancer.

    “It was everything. It brightened me up when I was down,” Donavan said. “It helped me out so much.”

  • LONG Building Technologies Inc. announces its headquarters building at 5001 S. Zuni St. in Littleton was recently awarded LEED (for commercial interiors) Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.
    The LEED rating system, developed by the council, is the internationally accepted standard for energy efficient, sustainable and high performing buildings, and provides building owners a framework for designing and implementing green building design and operations. Gold is the second highest in LEED’s four levels of certification.