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Today's Features

  • Any one of the Harley-Davidson or BMW motorcycles lined up at the Jeffco sheriff’s firing range was a bike lover’s dream. 

    And a bad guy’s nightmare. 

    The Sheriff’s Office hosted an advanced police motorcycle school for more than 50 officers from 11 area law enforcement agencies, including Jeffco deputies, on May 14-15. The 40-hour course gave the officers a rare chance to improve on their skills and to practice live-fire exercises while on their bikes. 

  • Veterans at Arapahoe Community College have a new home base at school. 

    The Veterans Service Center, which opened last month, was created by ACC to help meet the needs of the influx of veterans signing up for classes, said Nancy Nickless, Veterans Affairs certifying official and financial aid counselor for ACC. 

  • Columbine High School and the surrounding community took to the pavement again Saturday for the eighth annual Run for Remembrance through Clement Park. 

    The 5K run/walk raised money for Craig Hospital, the Columbine Memorial and the Frank DeAngelis Columbine High School Academic Foundation. 

  • History isn’t always made during epic events. 

    Sometimes it takes only a $30 check and two signatures. 

    When Jennifer Whitton and Tana Trejillo signed their civil union certificate last Wednesday morning at the Jeffco clerk and recorder’s office, staff members interrupted what they were doing to applaud. 

    It was the first same-sex civil union in Jefferson County.

    Whitton and Trejillo, together five and a half years, were all smiles as they handed over the $30 check to the county.  

  • If you’re trying to inspire kids to pursue a career in science, engineering, math or technology, it helps to have an astronaut and some liquid nitrogen on your side. 

    Lockheed Martin opened up its Waterton Facility in Littleton to about 1,400 kids last Thursday as part of its nationwide Young Minds at Work Day. Company employees brought their kids and their kids’ friends for a day of science-based fun that featured NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, along with a few rockets and frozen rubber balls.

  • Ah, duct tape. Is there anything it can’t do?

    The handyman’s favorite tool to fix anything around the house is also one of the most versatile materials for do-it-yourself craft projects. The wide tape, which can be found in a variety of colors and designs, can be used to make anything from wallets and purses to full-length prom dresses.

    “My friend makes a lot of things with duct tape. She made a prom dress for her sister completely out of duct tape,” said Sarah Bruner, 13. “It’s pretty easy to work with.”

  • Gray skies couldn’t dampen the mood of the more than 200 participants in the 20th annual Courage Walk in Golden on Saturday morning.

    The annual event honors the strength and courage of crime victims and those who have lost loved ones to violence. The Courage Walk coincides with National Victims’ Rights Week.

    Jeffco probation department employees Brandy Lewis and Wendy Ala participated in the Courage Walk for the first time.

  • When people from different generations discuss music, discord is often the result. It’s a rare teenager that enjoys Lawrence Welk’s version of “Moon River,” and no one bought her grandmother a Jay-Z album for Easter. 

    But an orchestra that has come together for Front Range Christian School’s performance of “Fiddler on the Roof” includes ninth-graders and 50-year-olds, and they are making beautiful music together.

  • Michael Nugent was recently appointed executive director at Life Care Center of Littleton, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility.
    “We have an exceptionally qualified staff here,” said Nugent, “and the building itself is beautiful.”
    Nugent comes to Life Care Center of Littleton from San Diego, Calif., where he served as executive director at a skilled nursing facility. Prior to that appointment, he was executive director at a skilled nursing facility in Hot Springs, Mont.

  • Working without a net poses a certain amount of risk — but also can provide a visceral thrill. A class in improv acting at Chatfield High School is teaching 25 students to trust their instincts and the ability to think on their feet.  

    “It’s definitely challenging,” said Wren Schuyler, a Chatfield senior. “You have to have a bunch of ideas flowing through your mind at a million miles a minute at every moment.”