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Education

  • Jeffco school board candidates face off at candidate forum

    Student achievement, school funding and teacher retention were among the near dozen topics that Jeffco school board candidates sparred over Oct. 17 at a candidate forum co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Jefferson County and Together Colorado at Jefferson Unitarian Church in Golden.

  • Former employee suing Jeffco Schools

    A Conifer man is suing Jeffco Public Schools over allegations that the school district, as well as one of its transportation directors, discriminated against him on the basis of a disability and violated the Americans with Disabilities Act while he was employed by the district last year.

  • Chatfield teacher receives honor

    Clark Stukey, a special education teacher at Chatfield High School, was recognized Thursday by the Jeffco school board for being named the Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities’ 2017 Outstanding Teacher of the Year.
    Stukey, a 24-year teaching veteran, was honored in June 2017 with the annual award, which recognizes “outstanding performance and commitment by a professional who works in the field of learning disabilities in a role outside of the classroom.”

  • Glass: Underspend dollars, reserves likely to fund sixth-grade transition

    Jeffco Public Schools will likely fund needed classroom additions at two South Jeffco schools impacted by the district’s shifting of sixth grade to middle school with surplus budget dollars and reserve funding next year, according to Superintendent Jason Glass.
    On Nov. 1, Glass said that while the Jeffco school board hasn’t yet approved funding for classroom additions at Summit Ridge and Ken Caryl middle schools, it isn’t because the money isn’t there.

  • Education briefs

    Columbine principal resigns to take job in Aurora
    Three years after succeeding Frank DeAngelis as principal of Columbine High School, KC Somers resigned to take a position as a P-20 Learning Community Director with Aurora Public Schools.
    In a resignation letter dated Sept. 8, Somers expressed “mixed emotions” about his decision to take on the new role, which will see him provide leadership and support for students, teachers and principals across the Aurora school district instead of just at an individual school.

  • Sock puppets help students warm up to storytelling

    For a group of elementary students at Montessori Peaks Academy, puppets play a special role in the storytelling process.

    As part of a unit, the first-, second- and third-grade students create puppets based on the protagonist and antagonist in stories they have written. Ultimately, the youngsters use their sock-puppet creations to learn more about dialogue and character development.

    “It helps them learn dialogue. It helps them learn the tag versus the speech,” said teacher Jacquie Cartwright.

  • Ken Caryl student p-r-e-v-a-i-l-s at area spelling bee

    Spelling is the one subject Noah Dolan doesn’t mind studying.

    “I read a lot, so I just like words,” he said.

    That certainly proved true Tuesday night, when the Ken Caryl Middle School seventh-grader placed first in the Columbine Area Spelling Bee. Held at Columbine High School, the bee included the top two performers from the school-wide bees at Columbine Hills Elementary, Dutch Creek Elementary, Governor’s Ranch Elementary, Ken Caryl Middle School, Leawood Elementary and Normandy Elementary.

  • Jeffco school board votes to search for new superintendent

    The Jeffco school board voted unanimously Thursday night to search for a replacement for Superintendent Dan McMinimee.

    Citing weaknesses in McMinimee's performance — including his communication skills and management expertise — as well as a lack of trust among the “district's constituents,” school board members expressed a desire for a leader that can take Jeffco Public Schools “to the next level.”

  • A pearl of an effort

    The best way to start a Black Friday-esque tussle among sixth-graders is to offer them rolls of yarn at no cost.

    Well, maybe not at all sixth-graders. But that’s certainly what happened when Lynn Story offered free yarn to the sixth-graders in her knitting club at Leawood Elementary School.

    “Welcome to Leawood,” said 11-year-old Micah Harper with a mischievous grin as he clutched the colorful yarn he’d grabbed from Story’s bag.

  • Big Idea Project brings big recognition to teacher

    When Bryan Halsey created the Big Idea Project, it was simply a hands-on way to culminate the business leadership class he started at Columbine High School.

    “We basically challenge students to find a need in the world and then do something about it,” said the business and marketing teacher.