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Education

  • Decision not to host governor unrelated to politics, schools superintendent says

    Schools Superintendent Dan McMinimee says that rejecting an offer from Gov. John Hickenlooper to sign testing legislation at two Jeffco schools was related to safety, logistics and protocol — not politics.

    Hickenlooper’s staff reached out to both Bear Creek and Lakewood high schools as locations where the governor might sign House Bill 1323, which reduces the number of standardized tests students are required to take. The district said no thanks.

  • Judge issues injunction against school district's new-hire pay level

    A Jeffco district judge has issued a preliminary injunction preventing the school district from paying newly hired teachers at a higher rate until a lawsuit against the district by the teachers union goes to trial.

  • Chatfield principal to become superintendent for Englewood district

    The principal at Chatfield High School has been named the finalist for the Englewood School District’s superintendent position.

    Wendy Rubin was chosen from an original pool of 23 applicants for the soon-to-be-vacant superintendent post in Englewood. Englewood’s current superintendent, Brian Ewert, has been tapped as the next superintendent of Littleton Public Schools.

    Rubin has worked for Jeffco Public Schools for the past 14 years, the last four as principal at Chatfield.

  • Dahlkemper won't seek re-election to school board

    Jeffco school board member Lesley Dahlkemper has announced she will not run for a second term this fall, citing home and work responsibilities.

    Dahlkemper, who was elected in 2011 and is one of the board’s two liberal members, said the decision is not related to frequent friction with the board’s conservative majority over everything from facilities and budget to teacher pay and union relations.

  • Board votes to spend $15 million on new school

    The Jeffco school board voted 3-2 on Thursday to put $15 million saved last year toward building a new school in the northern part of the county.

    While $15 million is a fraction of the district’s $1 billion annual budget, the decision, approved with the votes of the board’s conservative majority, is controversial for several reasons:

  • The devil in the details

    Early negotiations between Jeffco Public Schools and the Jeffco Education Association have highlighted a long-existing source of tension: How much detail should be written into teachers’ contracts?

    Union negotiators argued for detailed contracts in sessions last week, pointing out that in the high-pressure day-to-day schedule of a teacher, prescriptive contract language can provide stability.

  • School board member apologizes for Facebook post

    A school board member who publicly shared a link on Facebook calling for parents to protest Friday’s LGBT Day of Silence said she didn’t read the post before sharing it and feels “sickened” over its message.

    Board member Julie Williams shared a link April 15 from ultraconservative campaign website SaveCalifornia.com that urged parents across the U.S. to keep their kids home from public schools to protest “perverse indoctrination” by “sexually confused” students and teachers.

  • Student demonstration calls attention to modern slavery

    Students from Front Range Christian School took part last week in an international effort to draw attention to the plight of those suffering under forced labor and slavery.

    Students from the school stood at South Santa Fe Drive and West Bowles Avenue throughout the day April 10 as part of the International Justice Mission’s Stand Up for Freedom Day.

  • Teachers union sues over pay-for-performance policy

    Jeffco’s teachers union is suing the school district over its divisive pay-for-performance policy, which is still in its first year.

    The Jefferson County Education Association’s lawsuit, filed April 7 amid contract negotiations with the teachers, asserts that the district’s pay plan was unilaterally implemented without union input, and that it will cause irreparable harm to teachers’ interests. The suit also claims the policy violated an existing contract with the teachers.

  • GOP chair withdraws from presentation to school district

    The chair of Colorado’s Republican Party decided not to participate in a Jeffco Public Schools panel on innovative practices in public education last week after the district was criticized for his involvement.

    State GOP chair Steve House was slated to make a presentation to the politically divided school board April 16 along with several other speakers, but withdrew his name April 12. The district received complaints from some members of the public, asking why House — whose career has been in health care technology — had been invited.