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Education

  • School board to get sunshine-law training — in secret

    Jeffco’s five new school board members will take about two hours at their next meeting to hear legal advice on “the Colorado Open Meetings Law, the Colorado Open Records Act, conflicts of interest and standards of conduct for local public officials.”

    The sunshine-law training will be held behind closed doors in an executive session.

  • New school board set to meet constituents

    Jeffco’s new school board members soon will head out into the community to meet their new constituents, members said at their first full board meeting Nov. 30.

    Ron Mitchell, Ali Lasell, Susan Harmon, Amanda Stevens and Brad Rupert, who were elected Nov. 3, said they would begin coordinating with various groups in each of their districts to set up meetings.

    As the district heads into budget season, board members will host community budget forums, which Stevens said could be a good opportunity to get to know Jeffco residents better.

  • District to hire communications director

    Jeffco Public Schools is in the process of hiring a new communications director, a move schools Superintendent Dan McMinimee delayed for several months during the run-up to the election.

  • Falcon Bluffs teacher inspires students’ quest for fitness

    Allyn Atadero has got the kids at Falcon Bluffs Middle School moving.

    Atadero, a physical education teacher at the South Jeffco school, was named the Colorado middle school P.E. teacher of the year by SHAPE Colorado. He was nominated by Jeffco Public Schools in part for his SPARK FITStep program, in which students use pedometers to track physical activity in gym class.

  • Conservative board members approve $9,500 in bonuses for superintendent

    Jeffco schools Superintendent Dan McMinimee will be paid $9,500 in bonuses after his first year of work, the outgoing school board decided on a 3-2 vote Nov. 5.

    McMinimee’s awards represent 24 percent of possible bonuses in his contract. The bonuses hinged on his meeting goals set by the district and the school board.

  • Attorney hired by school board’s conservative majority resigns

    Jeffco school board attorney Brad Miller, who was hired by the ousted conservative majority after they gained control of the board two years ago, has resigned, according to a letter he submitted Monday.

    Miller, who was hired in December 2013 to provide independent legal counsel to the school board, wrote that he’d learned from incoming board member Ron Mitchell that the newly elected board didn’t intend to retain him.

  • Student performance on PARCC test falls short of expectations

     More than half of the Colorado third- through 11th-graders who took the controversial PARCC exams last spring did not meet expectations in math and English language arts, according to data released by the Colorado Department of Education.

  • McMinimee earns 24% of possible bonuses during first year

    Jeffco schools Superintendent Dan McMinimee met benchmarks to qualify for about $9,500 in performance bonuses after his first year on the job.

    McMinimee’s contract allowed for up to $40,000 in bonuses if he met a number of goals set by the district and the school board.

  • D’Evelyn named best public high school in state

    D’Evelyn Junior/Senior High School has been named the best public high school in Colorado for 2015 by the educational research website StartClass.

    The ranking is based on D’Evelyn students’ average performance on a variety of standardized tests, along with other statistical information. SmartClass is operated by Graphiq, a statistical analysis company that works in a variety of fields.

  • Security team staying busy at schools during 2015

    Reports detailing a surge in threats handled by Jeffco Public Schools’ security and emergency management team led school board members Oct. 15 to approve funds for the department to hire four new staff members.

    The department has seen a 100 percent increase in threat assessments in the past year, said John McDonald, the district’s executive director of safety, security and emergency planning. Also, in the last two years, assessments performed on potentially suicidal students have increased 600 percent.