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Education

  • Board votes to spend $15 million on new school

    The Jeffco school board voted 3-2 on Thursday to put $15 million saved last year toward building a new school in the northern part of the county.

    While $15 million is a fraction of the district’s $1 billion annual budget, the decision, approved with the votes of the board’s conservative majority, is controversial for several reasons:

  • The devil in the details

    Early negotiations between Jeffco Public Schools and the Jeffco Education Association have highlighted a long-existing source of tension: How much detail should be written into teachers’ contracts?

    Union negotiators argued for detailed contracts in sessions last week, pointing out that in the high-pressure day-to-day schedule of a teacher, prescriptive contract language can provide stability.

  • School board member apologizes for Facebook post

    A school board member who publicly shared a link on Facebook calling for parents to protest Friday’s LGBT Day of Silence said she didn’t read the post before sharing it and feels “sickened” over its message.

    Board member Julie Williams shared a link April 15 from ultraconservative campaign website SaveCalifornia.com that urged parents across the U.S. to keep their kids home from public schools to protest “perverse indoctrination” by “sexually confused” students and teachers.

  • Student demonstration calls attention to modern slavery

    Students from Front Range Christian School took part last week in an international effort to draw attention to the plight of those suffering under forced labor and slavery.

    Students from the school stood at South Santa Fe Drive and West Bowles Avenue throughout the day April 10 as part of the International Justice Mission’s Stand Up for Freedom Day.

  • Kendallvue students see red on their first day

    The first day of school can be emotional and challenging, but the red-carpet treatment can ease youngsters’ anxieties.

    Students at Kendallvue Elementary School, near West Quincy Avenue and C-470 in Morrison, made the red-carpet walk into class Monday surrounded by their parents and teachers, who cheered them on as if they were celebrities arriving for a Hollywood premiere.

  • School board recall organizers reach signature-collection goal

    The group trying to recall Jeffco’s three conservative school board members has collected the signatures it needs to move forward with a recall election, a spokeswoman said.

    Jeffco United for Action over the weekend stopped gathering signatures to recall John Newkirk, Ken Witt and Julie Williams, according to spokeswoman Lynea Hansen. The group announced Tuesday afternoon that it had collected more than 110,000 signatures.

  • School district launches all-inclusive app

    A mobile app recently launched by Jeffco Public Schools offers details on everything from schools’ daily lunch offerings to weather closures to health-based tips, a recent district news release says.

    The application, which is called “Jeffco Public Schools,” can be downloaded for free at Apple iTunes or Google Play by students, parents, district staff and community members.

    Parents will also be able to get emergency notifications for specific schools.

  • ACC lands federal grant for health information technology program

    Arapahoe Community College has been awarded a multimillion-dollar federal grant to expand the college’s health information technology program.

    The four-year, $2.39 million grant comes from the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training program. ACC was one of 71 schools across the country to receive funds from the program this year.

  • Spokeswoman for Jeffco Schools resigns

     Jeffco Public Schools chief communications officer Lisa Pinto has submitted a letter of resignation and will be stepping down from her position effective June 19, according to the district’s superintendent.

    Pinto wrote in her May 28 resignation that she is leaving the district for another job.

  • Columbine team has the biggest, best idea

    A big idea from a group of Columbine High School students has turned out to be a big winner.

    Columbine’s team placed first last weekend in the inaugural statewide Big Idea competition with its project Denver Push, which focused on accessibility for the disabled. Kale Reader, 17, Dan DeGraaf, 17, Ty Duffy, 18, and Megan Lacy, 17, each won a $1,500 college scholarship.