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Local News

  • Comedy, tragedy meet during Shakespeare in the Park

    Never was there a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo — this time featuring cell phones, city skyline backdrops, line dancing and contemporary musical interludes.

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Theatre Company presented performances of “Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet” July 22-23 at Clement Park, and will host two more performances this Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.

  • Health club cooks up winning combo

    “The gym with the kitchen.” That’s how the new Whole Health Club in Littleton wants to be known.

    The club, which is near West Bowles Avenue and South Lowell Boulevard, opened two weeks ago and offers its clients personal training in both fitness and cooking.

  • Festival draws Irish-Americans and 'Irish at heart'

    English priest Saint Edmund Campion once described the Irish people as “religious, frank, amorous … very glorious … inclined with passing hospitality,” Dennis Gallagher, professor emeritus at Regis University, told attendees at the 22nd annual Colorado Irish Festival.

  • Program helps hungry kids during the summer

    For some children, the summer months seem to fly by. Between summer sports, camping, nature walks, swimming and other outdoor activities, there's always something to do. But, is there always something to eat?

    With school ending, kids who rely on school breakfasts and lunches as their only stable source of food might struggle to find proper nutrition during the summer.

  • Percussion group keeps a steady rhythm

    "Oh yeah. I like ice cream. Oh yeah. I like ice cream.”

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap. Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap.

    A circle of 30 people, each with a percussion instrument in hand, sound out the rhythm. Then, progressively, it evolves.

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap. Tap, boom, boom, tap.

    Each person beats out a different rhythm, a different sound, or a different timbre. Yet they all complement one another, weaving in and out of the collective beat.

  • Hikers raising money, awareness for veterans’ causes

    Operation: New Trails.

    It sounds like a military operation, and, in some small and unofficial way, it is. More than 60 hikers from across the nation — including one from Canada — are taking to the Colorado Trail this week to raise money and awareness for wounded veterans.

  • CASA volunteers provide a voice, support for kids dealing with courts

    A girl named Sally lives in Jeffco with one of her parents, who has a substance abuse problem, and there have been allegations of neglect and/or abuse. The case is going to court, and Sally is scared and confused.

    In cases like this hypothetical one, the child may be assigned one of Jeffco’s court-appointed special advocate volunteers, who will be a constant in her life. The volunteer would meet Sally on a weekly basis to make sure all her needs are met.

  • West Metro Fire hosts 11-day technical rescue course

    A construction worker is trapped in a trench, with a 20-inch pipe pinning his torso and legs. He’s stuck in a confined and unstable space, being crushed under a large structure. He should be terrified, but he isn’t.

    This scenario was an exercise — the final test, actually — for firefighters enrolled in West Metro Fire’s technical rescue course.

  • Commissioners apparently violate Open Meetings Law

    Two of Jeffco’s county commissioners appeared to violate Colorado’s Open Meetings Law when they continued to discuss a measure involving changes to county regulations while the board was in recess.

    The apparent violation occurred Sept. 29 during a public hearing on proposed changes to county regulations governing such things as roadway design, land development and storm drainage. The board went into a short recess after Commissioner Don Rosier asked if the hearing could be postponed to a later date to give the board more time to analyze changes to the proposal.

  • Smart-phone app alerts CPR-trained to nearby patients in need of help

    Let’s say you’re at the grocery store and your smart phone alerts you that someone in the parking lot is having a heart attack. Even though you’re not a medical expert, you know cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and you rush out to start or assist with CPR. And, maybe, thanks to that timely aid, the patient recovers.

    This is the idea behind the smart-phone application PulsePoint CPR/AED that West Metro Fire Rescue has launched in its district.