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Local News

  • City promotes urban renewal in meeting with residents

    Littleton hosted a town hall meeting on the urban renewal process as part of its ongoing effort to counteract what the city sees as misinformation about urban renewal.

    The meeting at Arapahoe Community College on Oct. 28 drew about 200 people. Residents were asked to give the city feedback on questions including their age, perception and knowledge of urban renewal, whether they had children in Littleton Public Schools, and whether they owned a business in town.

  • Foothills finalizes sale of parcel

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District finalized the sale of a parcel on the northwest corner of South Wadsworth Boulevard and West Coal Mine Avenue last week, netting the district $1.075 million after commission.

    The property will be developed into a two-story medical center with a surgical unit, emergency medical care and overnight care. The property had to be rezoned by Jefferson County to allow for overnight stays before the sale could go forward, said Foothills Executive Director Ron Hopp.

  • Investigation continues into Jeffco jail death

    An investigation into the death of a female inmate at the Jeffco jail is awaiting the findings of an autopsy report.

    The Sheriff’s Office has completed interviews in its investigation and is awaiting the coroner’s report on Jennifer Lobato, 37, said sheriff’s spokeswoman Jacki Kelley. That report could take several more weeks to complete.

  • School district negotiating groups raise questions regarding Open Meetings Law

    The recent move by Jeffco Public Schools and the teachers union to take portions of contract negotiations behind closed doors falls into a murky area of Colorado’s Open Meetings Law.

    The district and the Jefferson County Education Association opened negotiations this month, and both sides agreed early on to break into small study groups and examine several priority topics. The two groups announced last week that meetings of the small groups would not be open to the public.

  • Commissioners OK resolution on development, property rights

    Jeffco’s county commissioners have approved a resolution designed to emphasize the county’s commitment to fairly weigh all development applications and to protect property rights.

    The resolution was presented by Commissioner Don Rosier during staff briefings April 14 and was approved on a 3-0 vote April 21.  

  • School has its day in the sun as solar panels are switched on

    Even under cloudy skies last week, the future looked bright at Mackintosh Academy.

    The private school flipped the switch on 97 new solar panels that will provide up to 70 percent of the school’s electricity and save more than $285,00 over the next 30 years. Yet it wasn’t the energy or cost savings the panels will provide that drew hundreds to the gymnasium last Thursday.

  • Consultant selected to fill Littleton City Council vacancy

    The Littleton City Council has chosen a replacement for former council member Randy Stein, who resigned March 27 after serving less than a year and a half of his four-year term.

    William Hopping was selected April 14 by the remaining six council members to fill the vacancy. Hopping’s selection was officially approved during the council’s April 21 meeting.

    Hopping was one of seven applicants for the position and was selected unanimously. Council member Bruce Beckman said Hopping had “the best blend of quality attributes.”

  • Child abuse charges against bus driver are dropped

    The Jeffco district attorney has dropped child abuse charges against a school bus driver who was accused of grabbing a disruptive pre-teen by the throat in January.

    The DA on April 8 dismissed two misdemeanor child abuse charges against Littleton resident David Blanchard, citing a lack of evidence, said DA’s spokeswoman Pam Russell.

  • Kempe, Dozier retain seats on IREA board

    Both foothills-area directors of the Intermountain Rural Electric Association retained their seats on the nonprofit power co-op’s board in this month’s election.

    Pine Junction resident Duke Dozier, whose district stretches from Kenosha Pass to Aspen Park and includes some parts of Castle Rock, outpolled his opponent by less than 350 votes.

    Littleton resident Mike Kempe, who represents an area from Aspen Park east to Castle Pines and Roxborough, retained his seat by a much larger margin.

  • Columbine High closed Monday in memory of shooting victims

    Columbine High School was closed Monday in memory of the 12 students and a teacher who lost their lives 16 years ago at the school.

    The tradition of closing the school in honor of those that died was continued by new Columbine principal K.C. Somers, who replaced former principal Frank DeAngelis this year after DeAngelis retired.

    DeAngelis was scheduled to be at the school’s library to lead a moment of silence at 11:20 a.m.