.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • A voyage into learning

    In the summer of 1856, Capt. Samuel Comstock took 32 men from New Bedford, Mass., into the North Atlantic, beginning a three-year sojourn that would claim the life of one crewman and hundreds of sperm whales.

    Etched neatly into a tattered and fading logbook are the details of that voyage, from a time when homes across the country glowed dimly from hurricane lanterns burning whale oil. The logbook, a 300-page nautical and financial record of the Governor Troup ship, sat virtually untouched for a century and a half.

  • Jeffco employees offered healthy incentive to take survey

    Jefferson County is offering most of its full-time employees $50 to take online health-assessment surveys, a program for which it has set aside more than $100,000.

    Though the surveys, which are an attempt to make employees more aware of their personal health risks, would cost $119,000 if all employees with health benefits participate, the county anticipates a response of only 40 to 50 percent.

    “We have a certain budget for all wellness, and this is a component of it,” county Human Resources Director Jennifer Fairweather said.

  • Lovelorn goose feeling down

    Many love stories have withstood the test of time: Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella and Prince Charming, and even Bella and Edward.

    Morrison has its own love story that is just squawking be told: Pedro and Juanita.

    Pedro and Juanita are Chinese white geese who have lived together in Morrison with their owners, Marie and George McLaughlin. Pedro recently died, leaving Nita mourning for her constant companion.

    So the McLaughlins are looking for a new friend for the lovelorn Juanita.

  • Locals flock to nature center to watch bald eagles

    Armed with binoculars and a birding field guide, 11-year-old Ben Sampson trekked through the back trails at South Platte Park on a recent Saturday morning as part of a ranger-led bald eagle tour offered by the Carson Nature Center.

  • Commissioners set to resurrect county audit committee

    More than six months after the county commissioners unexpectedly dissolved Jeffco’s audit committee, the board last week began resurrecting a group tasked with reviewing the county’s financial audits.

    A new, more structured audit committee will be more independent and transparent, county officials said at a Jan. 31 meeting, and members will also receive more training.

  • A ‘fracking’ consensus?

    Who would have thought with the emphasis on our state’s new-energy economy that advances in ways to extract oil and natural gas would trigger economic opportunities in the energy industry in Colorado? And yet, that is what is happening as energy companies are preparing to utilize hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to extract energy around Colorado.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Of munchies and misdemeanors

  • Ethics commission’s finding on McCasky delayed

    Colorado’s Independent Ethics Commission on Monday determined that former Jeffco commissioner Kevin McCasky did not violate the state’s gift-ban law when he voted to approve $400,000 in county contributions to his future employer, the Jefferson Economic Council, which was considering his application at the time to become the organization’s executive director.

     

  • Librarians, classroom coaches, assistant principals defend their jobs

    Groups of Jeffco Public Schools employees made their cases before the Board of Education to be spared from budget cuts Feb. 2 at a meeting cut short by last week’s snowstorm.
    Teacher librarians, instructional coaches, assistant principals and others filled more than two hours of public comment with short speeches about the need for their jobs.
    Though board members were slated to discuss for the first time their preferences for $50 million to $60 million in cuts over the next two years, the rapidly approaching storm led the board to postpone discussion to a later meeting.

  • Snowstorm socks South Jeffco

    A snowstorm that began Thursday evening and continued throughout the day Friday, closing schools and government offices and making travel hazardous, finally tapered off Saturday morning.

    The slow-moving storm was accompanied by wind gusts up to 40 mph, limiting visibility and piling drifts high. More than 18 inches of snow had fallen at some locations in South Jeffco.

    Weather closures Friday included Jeffco Public Schools, Jefferson County offices, Jefferson County Public Library locations and Foothills Park & Recreation District facilities.