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Local News

  • Former Foothills board member seeks appointment

    Although he has already been elected twice and served nine years on the Foothills Park & Recreation District board, business executive and fitness fanatic Mike Whetstone, 54, has applied to be appointed to the vacant seat from Ward 2.

  • West Quincy Avenue project under way

     West Quincy Avenue from West Radcliffe Place to Nelson Street was closed to through traffic May 8 to realign and widen the two-lane road to four lanes, adding bicycle lanes and sidewalks. The work is scheduled to be completed Nov. 4.

    The $3 million project covers 1 mile of Quincy Avenue from South Kipling Parkway to South Simms Street. It is funded by the Southeast Jefferson County One-Half Cent Sales Tax program.

  • Nunes seeks second term on Foothills board via appointment

     Jill Nunes, chairperson of the Foothills Park & Recreation District board for the last three years, has submitted her name for the open seat created when her term expires this year. Nunes opted not to run for re-election from Ward 2 in the May 8 election.

    Since there were no candidates on the ballot in Ward 2, the position must be filled by a board appointment.

  • Disaster training drill happening Saturday

    A large-scale disaster-training drill involving a simulated tornado catastrophe is taking place Saturday, May 19, at the Metro Fire Training Academy in Littleton and the Rocky Mountain Fire Academy at Stapleton in Denver.

    More than 100 local Community Emergency Response Team members and other search-and-rescue volunteers will be assisted by professional responders from the North Central All-Hazards Emergency Management Region. The exercise goes from 9 a.m. to noon.

  • Park district to interview board hopefuls

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District board will hold a special meeting at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, to interview potential candidates for the Ward 2 vacancy on the board.

    After the interview session, there will be a regular board meeting at 6 p.m. The topic of "board appointment" is on the second meeting agenda. Both meetings are at The Peak Community and Wellness Center, 6612 Ward St. The meetings are open to the public.

  • Voters elect 3 to West Metro Fire board

    Residents of the West Metro Fire District elected three new members to four-year terms on the board of directors in the election May 8.
    Pamela Feely won in District 4 with 515 votes. Feely ran uncontested.
    Kristin Moeder won in District 6 with 454 votes. Her opponent, J.B. Robert Espinoza, had 81 votes.
    Wendy Ann Volmer won in District 7 with 465 votes, compared to 69 votes for Gary Philpott.

  • Incumbent Maulik re-elected to Foothills board

    Incumbent Terri Maulik was decisively re-elected to a second four-year term May 8 on the Foothills Park & Recreation District board of directors.

    In the only contested seat, in Ward 5, Maulik soundly defeated challenger Clarence Kissler, 806 votes to 443.

    "I feel like the first four (years) were about learning and emptying out the closets and the clutter," Maulik had said before the election. "The main focus needs to be on capital improvements and repairs and bringing in more revenue.”

  • Sheriff's Calls

    The perfect crime

  • Sign-up under way for library’s Summer Reading Club

     Sign-up is under way for the Jeffco Public Library’s Summer Reading Club, which is held from June 1 through July 31. The club offers a chance for kids and teens who complete eight hours of reading to win a Kindle Fire, and for adults to win an iPad3.

    Details of the kids' Summer Reading Club, "Dream Big: Read," are available at www.jeffcolibrary.org/summerreading. Many of the programs will require tickets.

  • Church on a mission to build new worship space

    Parishioners at Light of the World Roman Catholic Church do not sit in pews or kneel on kneelers. Instead, they have folding chairs and garden-style sponge kneepads.

    When the church was built in 1984 at Bowles and Kipling, the idea was to save money by having one large multipurpose space rather than a church and a community center.

    The "crying room," where parents with babies can be seated behind glass, is situated behind a bank of French doors, making it so hard to see the altar that the occupants watch Mass on a monitor.