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Local News

  • Boost in school-lunch price brings added funds

    Since implementing a 25 percent price increase for most school lunches earlier this year, Jeffco Public Schools has begun netting a profit in its food services fund, money that is currently sitting idle.

    In the first financial quarter of the school year, the district netted nearly $765,000 more than during the same period last year, representing positive income of $409,500 — a substantial departure from 2010, when the fund operated at a loss.

  • Commissioners pass budget with potential pay raises for employees

    Some Jeffco sheriff’s employees are now eligible for overdue merit-based pay increases, after the county commissioners passed on a 2-1 vote Dec. 6 a budget that allocates an additional $1.4 million to the department for discretionary spending in 2012.

    Overall, the $476 million county budget cuts $600,000 from the 2011 spending plan and includes $3.5 million in funds to be used at the discretion of department heads, including pay increases for subordinates.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Blinded by the light

  • State Supreme Court affirms congressional redistricting lines

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday affirmed Denver Judge Robert Hyatt’s congressional redistricting map, lines that take Mike Coffman’s District 6 out of Jefferson County and lump South Jeffco into District 1, represented by Democrat Diana Degette.

    Supreme Court judges heard arguments Dec.1 in the appeal of Hyatt’s decision, which was filed by Douglas County and others. Though the court released its decision Monday morning, a written opinion was not yet available.

  • Foothills again delays land sale

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District has again postponed a controversial $2.7 million sale of more than 17 acres of land near South Simms and South Ward streets to a housing developer.
    About 25 Shadow Ridge neighborhood residents and others packed the district’s meeting room on Nov. 22 to protest the sale, which many said violates one of Foothills’ own resolutions from 1999 that specified the land in question was to remain as undeveloped open space.

  • Foothills again delays land sale

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District has again postponed a controversial $2.7 million sale of more than 17 acres of land near South Simms and South Ward streets to a housing developer.
    About 25 Shadow Ridge neighborhood residents and others packed the district’s meeting room on Nov. 22 to protest the sale, which many said violates one of Foothills’ own resolutions from 1999 that specified the land in question was to remain as undeveloped open space.

  • Living a cloistered life in Littleton

    By Laura Herrington
    For the Courier
    On a recent Monday just before 6:30 a.m., 30 of the faithful motor up a partially hidden driveway to the historic house at 6138 S. Gallup St. They trickle into a small, unadorned chapel and sit scattered on the wooden pews, waiting for Mass to begin.

  • Columbine survivor to point lens at shootings' aftermath

    At age 17, Sam Granillo said he wasn’t ready to see a counselor.
    Following the Columbine shootings, a flood of offers from local therapists inundated many students who, like Granillo, were years from understanding the full effects the event would have on their adult lives.
    Today, at 29, Granillo rarely sleeps without intense nightmares — a delayed effect of the three hours he spent crammed into a kitchen office with 17 others at the high school, at times bracing against the door to keep at least one of the shooters from entering.

  • The holiday’s main event: Main Street in downtown Littleton jammed as locals welcome the Jolly Elf

    By Laura Herrington
    For the Courier
    Former Littleton resident Carl Gwynn travels each year from Salt Lake City for the annual Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting downtown, proclaiming it the best Christmas event in the country.

  • Sheriff losing officers to cities with higher pay

    The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has for years been losing newly trained recruits and deputies to other metro-area police agencies, which employees attribute to a longstanding hiatus of the department’s step-and-grade pay system.

    Though the Sheriff’s Office said it could not provide a specific number of employees who left for greener pastures, other local law enforcement agencies have been luring away deputies since 2007 with offers of better pay, Sheriff Ted Mink said.