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Local News

  • Divisions surface on county’s marijuana task force

    Members of Jeffco’s marijuana task force are divided not only on the effects of pot use but also on whether studies available about recreational marijuana are valid.

    Those divisions surfaced during the task force’s meeting on June 9, when members went back and forth on the validity of diverging studies showing the impacts of marijuana use. The competing data involved everything from impaired driving to effects on teenagers’ IQs.  

  • Losing candidates sue in West Metro election

    Two losing candidates in the West Metro Fire District’s May 6 board election are suing to void the results due to what they claim was a lack of secrecy in the ballot counting. 

    The lawsuit — filed June 2 by District 3 candidate Clyde Wadsworth, District 2 candidate Devin Howard, the two candidates’ authorized election watcher, and the Colorado Union of Taxpayers — claims the secrecy of the ballots was broached during the count.  

  • Inter-Canyon urges residents to submit statements

    Officials with the Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District are asking residents to submit victim impact statements before the sentencing of former fire chief David MacBean on June 24.

    MacBean pleaded guilty in April to stealing $647,000 from the department to make unauthorized purchases from 2010 to 2012. MacBean faces up to 27 years in prison and has agreed to pay back the stolen funds as part of his plea.

  • Driver involved in accident that killed deputy pleads guilty

    The driver whose vehicle struck and killed Jeffco sheriff’s Sgt. David Baldwin pleaded guilty June 9 to vehicular homicide. 

    Kenneth Hosch, 83, of Golden could face two to six years in prison. Hosch is currently free on $10,000 bond while he awaits sentencing on Aug. 29.

    The accident occurred just after 10 a.m. Jan. 26 when Hosch passed several cars on Colorado 93 north of West 64th Parkway. Hosch’s vehicle reportedly continued to travel in the opposite lane for about 1,500 feet after passing the cars. 

  • The legacy of freedom

    Tanya Hayes clutched a dry-cleaning bag holding an old green U.S. Army uniform as she scanned the crowd at the Salute to the Greatest Generation-70th Anniversary of D-Day on June 6 at Littleton's World War II Memorial. A smaller bag pinned to the jacket held an assortment of Army medals. 

  • Littleton makes first move to ban retail pot stores

    Littleton City Council took the first step to permanently ban retail marijuana stores within city limits, much to the dismay of a medical marijuana store owner in the city. 

    On a 4-3 vote, the council approved an ordinance banning retail marijuana sales on first reading during its meeting on June 3. The ordinance’s second reading will be July 1, and the meeting will include a presentation by city staff and public comment before a final vote.  

  • Redevelopment moves forward despite challenge

    As Littleton is poised to study four areas of the city for possible redevelopment, a former Littleton mayor has issues with the city continuing to use what he calls a failed model of redevelopment that previously cost the city millions of dollars. 

    At the beginning of the year, the council directed its urban renewal authority, Littleton Investing in Tomorrow or LIFT, to identify areas in the city for potential redevelopment. Since then, LIFT has focused on four areas of the city: Broadway Boulevard, Columbine Square, Littleton Boulevard and Santa Fe Drive. 

  • Chatfield swimming beach reopened after E. coli levels drop

    Chatfield State Park’s swimming beach has reopened after being closed for two days last week when high levels of the E. coli bacteria were discovered in the water. 

    On the morning of June 3, Colorado Parks and Wildlife closed thebeach after a water test showed E. coli levels just above the allowed limit of 235 organisms per 100 milliliters of water. The swimming beach was closed as soon as the testes were completed. 

    By late afternoon June 4, bacteria levels had decreased well below the allowed limit and the beach reopened.

  • Jeffco commissioners urged to take over for Maximus

    There’s a strong push for counties across Colorado to take back processing some Medicaid applications from a private company that’s had a difficult time meeting time and quality guarantees.

    More than 40 heads of county human services departments indicated they’d like their county commissioners to approve taking over processing Medicaid medical claims from Maximus, a private company contracted by the state, said Gini Pingenot, policy and research supervisor at Colorado Counties Inc. The group met during the Colorado Counties Inc. conference last week.

  • Interview with David MacBean: ‘I’m going to live with this the rest of my life’

    Former Inter-Canyon fire chief David MacBean blames a lack of oversight and his own personal problems for stealing $647,000 from the district.

    In an exclusive interview with the Courier, MacBean, who pleaded guilty in April to two counts of theft and one of embezzlement, also said the nominal stipend he received as chief led him to resent the job, and to use the district credit card “to surround myself with stuff.”

    He faces up to 27 years in prison at sentencing on June 24.