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Local News

  • Motorcycle crash kills Lakewood man early morning June 16

    A 24-year-old man died June 16 after crashing his motorcycle in South Jeffco.

    Mitchell Marsolek of Lakewood was driving his motorcycle southbound on South Holland Way at about 2 a.m. when he drifted off the west side of the road, causing the motorcycle to roll near the intersection with West Maplewood Place, according to the Colorado State Patrol. Marsolek was thrown off the motorcycle and collided with multiple objects, sustaining serious injuries. He was transported to Swedish Medical Center in Englewood and pronounced dead at 2:35 a.m.

  • Lyons Ridge gets final approval

    Jefferson County commissioners have voted 2-1 in favor of a proposed subdivision near C-470 and U.S. 285 that will bring 230 homes to land near the scenic Dakota Hogback.

    The final hearing was June 10.

    The 284-acre parcel, owned by Colorado Christian University, will be sold to Shea Properties, which will complete the project. Abandoned buildings at the location from a former college campus will be torn down by December, a Shea representative said.

    Commissioner Kevin McCasky led the vote in favor of the development, with Commissioner Jim Congrove also approving it.

  • CDOT nixes beltway study; Jeffco vows to plow ahead

    The Colorado Department of Transportation cited a lack of funding June 9 in ending its study on completing the highway connection from C-470 to U.S. 36, a project Jeffco officials have been pushing hard.

    Although CDOT will end its study and publish a report on what it has learned to date in July, Jeffco officials vow to march forward in creating a highway to “buckle the beltway.”

  • Lyons Ridge gets final approval

    Jefferson County commissioners have voted 2-to-1 in favor of a proposed subdivision near C-470 and U.S. 285 that will add 230 homes to that South Jefferson County.

    The final hearing for the Lyons Ridge rezoning application was June 10.

    Colorado Christian University, who owns the 284-acre parcel, will be selling land to Shea Properties for the development. Abandoned buildings at the location from a former college campus will be torn down by December, a Shea representative said.

  • School district seeks funds for building upgrades, educational needs

    Taxpayers in Jefferson County will be asked to decide this fall whether to allow the school district to issue $323 million to $350 million in debt and assess taxpayers between $32 million and $36 million a year.

    The district is proposing a two-part program — the bond issue and a “mill levy override.” The mill levy override is an increase in the mill levy, above and beyond what taxpayers have previously approved.

    The mill levy override would cost a homeowner about $3.35 a month for each $100,000 of assessed valuation.

  • County Briefs: Residents without DTV signal should contact stations

    Jefferson County residents who suddenly stopped receiving free, over-the-air digital television signals when a new antenna was installed on Lookout Mountain on May 12 should contact the local broadcast stations.

  • Columbine grad drowns after saving friend

    A Columbine High School graduate died May 31 after he jumped into a pool of water to save a friend.

    Stephen F. Burns II, 19, was camping with friends near the Little Dolores River near Grand Junction, according to Heather Benjamin, spokesperson for the Mesa County Sheriff's Office.

  • Windshield goes to watery grave

    SOUTH JEFFCO — A South Jeffco woman was the victim of a drive-by water balloon attack last week that left her spirit rattled and her windshield cracked. She told deputies that she was driving east on Quincy Avenue at about Carr Street when an unknown object hit her windshield. She saw a gray car heading the other direction and tried to follow it but soon lost it in the neighborhood. She pulled her car over and asked a woman to call 911. As she was waiting for deputies, the suspect's car drove by again, and the woman's husband gave chase.

  • Foothills faces grim financial picture: Rising costs, flat revenues expected through 2020

    Between now and 2020, the Foothills Park & Recreation District will face flat revenues as costs continue to rise — in some cases by roughly 25 percent annually.

  • Scouts give retired flags a dignified sendoff

    Like many things in life, an American flag will eventually reach the point where it needs to be retired. But with the flag’s powerful sentimental and symbolic value, the stars and stripes cannot simply be thrown away.

    An American flag that will wave no more must be burned.

    The national Flag Code says a flag, when it is in such a condition that it is not fitting for display, should "be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning."