.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • E-mail, phone scam uses Jeffco Credit Union logo

    Jeffco Credit Union of Lakewood on Friday temporarily halted online bank transactions after being deluged since Thursday with reports of phony e-mails and phone calls trying to get customers to disclose their credit card numbers. The scam is known as “phishing.”

    The credit union has disabled transferrals and withdrawals in an effort to prevent customers’ losses, 9News said Friday night. Account viewing is still allowed. Many people who are not members of the credit union are receiving the e-mails and phone calls.

  • Foothills approves 2008 budget

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District’s board of directors adopted its 2008 budget Dec. 12, providing spending guidelines that the district hopes will prevent it from making any service reductions as it seeks a mill-levy increase in May.

    The 2008 budget numbers are below those of 2007, with revenue projected at $22,805,018; while this year saw revenue of $24,138,018. Expenditures for 2008 are set at $23,946,404, down $687,329 from 2007’s revised budget number of $24,946,404.

  • Peiffer students send Loving Hugs to kids in need

    On the last day before winter break, three Peiffer Elementary fourth-graders scrambled to clear the school’s Christmas tree of its presents.

    It was not a re-enactment of Dr. Seuss’ story about the Grinch. To the contrary, the tree was simply meant as a gathering place, somewhere where the more than 300 stuffed animals donated by students could stay until they were shipped off to kids in need across the world.

    The presents were part a drive sponsored by Loving Hugs Inc., a new nonprofit started by a South Jeffco resident in an effort to help children worldwide.

  • Taxes and tribulations: For south Jeffco, 2008 saw stories that mattered in the community

    Taxes, or the rejection thereof, liquor stores that look like cathedrals, new contracts, retirements and memorials.

    That was 2007, in the most concise list possible.

    But those who experienced the many stories might remember each in somewhat less simple terms. It might be saying too much — or maybe coming off too grandiose — to say that the stories and events define the community. However, it comes across as an elegant fact that the reason some stories stand above others is because of how much they matter to each community stakeholder.

  • Former Courier publisher Brad Bradberry dies

    Ask anyone who had the good fortune to work with former Evergreen Newspapers publisher Brad Bradberry about their old boss, and they’ll tell you about the best boss they ever had.

    “He always had faith in his employees,” says graphic designer Jeanne Ehmsen. “If you had a good idea, he’d let you run with it, and that’s pretty rare in this business. In a lot of ways, he was more like a father figure than a boss.”

  • The gift of giving: Holiday tree helps less fortunate have happy holidays

    Ryan, 15, wants puzzles for Christmas, or a gift card.

    Nichole, 11, wants a Kids Bop CD or Dance Dance Revolution, a video game where people dance their way to victory.

    Chelsea, 17, wants a Target gift card, and Johnny, 18, wants four tall T-shirts.

  • Variety of candidates join race to replace Tancredo

    Littleton Republican Congressman Tom Tancredo has made a name for himself on the national stage with his relentless pursuit of immigration reform, controversial statements and a presidential bid.

    And while Tancredo’s name has practically become a household word, the names of those vying to replace him are not. Several area Republicans have tossed their hats in the ring to replace Tancredo — state Sen. Ted Harvey, Secretary of State Mike Coffman, Wil Armstrong and state Sen. Steve Ward — and all could face off in next fall’s primary.

  • The spirit of Santa: Canterbury neighborhood recalls man who donned a red suit

    This time of year, Conrad Paquette’s neighbors remember him as Santa Claus.

    But the Canterbury residents also recall the time 15 years ago when “Conny” came to their aid, raising money to provide new playground equipment in Chaucer Park.

    Conrad Paquette died in 2001, but his spirit lives on in the Canterbury neighborhood, particular during the holidays.

    “It’s amazing how one life can affect an entire community,” said Barb Little, a former member of the Canterbury homeowners association.

  • ACC display celebrates immigrants who call Littleton area home

    The subject of immigration often sparks debate — so much so that people often forget the value a naturalized citizen brings to the country.

    But a new display in Arapahoe Community College’s atrium has been installed to remind the community of the people who have chosen to call the Littleton area home. Part of the Milestones Project, ACC’s exhibit, “Littleton: My International Home Sweet Home,” highlights some of the immigrants who add culture and value through their community contributions.

  • A new spin on lunch: Ken Caryl principal starts a karaoke revolution

    The lunchroom erupted in cheers as seventh-grader Grant Stavrakas finished belting out “Proud Mary.”

    And the cheers didn’t come simply because someone of Grant’s age could hit every note just like John Fogerty did in Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 1969 recording. It was also because Grant presided over the room with the flair of a rock ’n’ roll front man. He even brought a quartet of backup dancers.

    “It’s like he is a completely different person when he steps up there,” said Patrick Santos, his principal.