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Local News

  • Inter-Canyon hires consulting firm for 2018 election prep

    The Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District may try for a mill levy increase in the 2018 election, but first, the department must formulate a plan to gauge taxpayers’ receptiveness.

    In order to do so, the board of directors has for months been discussing hiring an outside consulting firm. After some discussion at its Oct. 11 meeting, the board unanimously voted to hire Turn Corps, a Denver-based political consulting firm, to help with election preparation.

  • When disaster hits, Colorado Task Force is there

    Being a member of the Colorado Urban Search and Rescue Task Force can be a bit unpredictable. A lot of the job involves waiting. And waiting. And waiting.

    But when disaster strikes, the team shifts into high gear.

  • New, improved Columbine Library reopening to the public Saturday

    After six months of construction, the newly renovated Columbine Library will open to the public on Saturday.

    Work on the project, which cost just over $4 million, began in April and — save a few pieces of furniture — should be complete when the library reopens.

    The West Bowles Avenue building was built in 1989 and hasn’t been updated since. Library-goers can expect to see a lot of changes when they walk through the newly placed doors of the library, and staff members believe these changes will create an improved experience for all.

  • Sheriff's Calls

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  • Jeffco introduces 2018 budget with average 3 percent pay increase

    Jeffco has proposed an average 3 percent increase in salaries and 2.5 percent increase in benefits for its employees for 2018. As a whole, the county would spend almost $11.5 million more on salaries and benefits than it did in its 2017 budget — a 4.7 percent increase.
    The county has a little more than 3,000 full-time and grant-funded employees; salaries and benefits has made up about half of the county’s expenditures the past several years, the Jeffco commissioners said.

  • JCSO’s detention deputy academy in full swing

    Editor’s note: This is the second of a three-part series.

    The instructor shouted, “Taser, Taser, Taser.”

    There was a short pop as probes shot into Casey Buell-Schoenman’s left hamstring. Thousands of volts of electricity coursed through his body, and his muscles went rigid.

    After a few seconds, the voltage ceased and his fellow recruits gave him a small round of applause as Buell-Schoenman pushed himself off the mat and stood up.

  • JCHS says alleged forgery had little impact

    Jefferson County Human Services says the alleged forgery by its former employee had no negative implications for the children and families it serves.

    Richelle Schultz, 53, was indicted in September on 22 felony counts of attempt to influence a public servant and forgery and is accused of falsifying information in 12 child abuse and neglect complaints. According to the Jefferson County grand jury, Schultz is accused of committing the alleged crimes between April 30, 2016 and June 30, 2016, while working as a child welfare casework with the county.

  • Event commemorates teenagers lost to suicide

    On a beautiful October morning, hundreds gathered at Clement Park to honor teenagers lost by suicide and to help raise money to prevent it.

    Although last Saturday’s 16th annual Second Wind Run/Walk did include a run and a walk, there was more to the day than that. Second Wind Fund staff, volunteers and community members congregated in South Jeffco for a fun-filled day, which included a short program, a memorial dove release, live music, family entertainment, sponsored booths and food. Mostly, though, the event was one of remembrance.

  • Morrison combating vehicle noise

    To some extent, noise will always be a concern for the town of Morrison.

    In a tourist-driven town that is home to Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre and Bandimere Speedway, much of it is to be expected.

    Now board members are discussing ways to combat a different type of noise – sound from vehicles and altered exhaust systems. The idea has come up in board meetings before but was reinforced by a recent letter from a resident.

  • Denver man facing new charges in fatal crash

    The initial case against a Denver man accused of causing an Aug. 28 crash on U.S. 285 that killed a 53-year-old motorcyclist has been dismissed, but new charges have been filed, according to the Jefferson County District Attorney’s office.

    Ian Fitzgerald O’Connor, 32, previously was facing various felony charges, including leaving the scene involving death and vehicular homicide. He appeared in Jeffco court on Friday and will return for a continued preliminary hearing on Dec. 22.