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Local News

  • Suspects plea not guilty, headed toward jury trial

    Two men — Jordan Lemarinel and Kenneth Crise — pleaded not guilty last Friday to felony charges of first-degree murder and will move forward with a jury trial.

    Lemarinel, 27, and Crise, 55, were arrested in May in connection with the death of Samuel Addison Stewart, a 26-year-old Dakota Ridge High School graduate and Littleton native.

  • Colorado Center for the Blind teaches students independence

    It is a crisp September morning, and Zach Harshbarger steps out of his Littleton apartment and into the morning sun.

    He cannot see the sun’s glow, but he feels its warmth on his face and finds comfort in knowing its rays are pointing him east. With a white cane in hand, Harshbarger makes his way to the bus stop, where he is greeted by a group of his classmates.

    Most have canes; some have dogs; but none can see.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Squelching a roomer

  • Jeffco’s Glass says the end of DACA would ‘rob our community’

    Three weeks after he publicly reiterated Jeffco Public Schools’ stance of support of students impacted by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, Superintendent Jason Glass says he remains concerned about plans by the federal government to possibly rescind the program next spring.

  • Gonzales charged with felony child abuse in toddler beating

    The man accused of seriously injuring a Littleton toddler earlier this month has been charged with one count of felony child abuse with serious bodily harm.

    Joshua James Gonzales, 21, who was publicly sought by the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office before turning himself in Sept. 17, appeared in a Jefferson County court Friday where he was formally charged with the Class 3 felony. According to Pam Russell, Jeffco DA’s spokeswoman, Gonzales faces 10 to 32 years in prison if convicted.

  • Morrison town board gives hiring, firing authority to town administrator

    Morrison’s Town Administrator Kara Winters now will be able to hire, fire and discipline employees — just in time for the town to hire a new chief for its police department. 
The decision, which was unanimously approved at a Sept. 19 board meeting, will take all personnel decision-making responsibility away from the town’s board of directors.

    “In the day we didn’t have a town manager, so the board was the hiring and firing authority,” said board member Allen Williams. “So that was miserable.”

  • Littleton residents concerned about road condition, traffic

    Littleton residents are concerned about traffic and road conditions, but city officials hope to allay their concerns and prepare for the future.

    The mayor, city manager and other officials met with the public on Sept. 20 to discuss the conditions of Littleton’s streets, sidewalks and infrastructure, and talk about future plans for improvement.

  • Morrison’s Cider Fest a true celebration of fall

    With apple cider, bluegrass music and cool, dreary weather, Saturday’s Cider Fest in Morrison served as the perfect kickoff to fall.

    “This is fall,” Gus Chambers, co-founder of the festival, said to the crowd who lounged on hay bales with cold beers in hand. “It was summer just about three days ago.”

    The festival began 28 years ago as a way to bring the small mountain community of Morrison together, and Gus marveled at its growth over the years.

  • Askins arraignment continued for 3rd time

    The arraignment for the man accused of lighting Roman candles that started the North Turkey Creek Fire on March 22 has been continued for the third time.

    Andrew Askins, 18, was charged in late April with two class-4 felonies of second-degree arson in connection with lighting fireworks while Jefferson County was in a stage-2 fire ban.

    He appeared before the court Monday for an arraignment but asked for a continuance. At an arraignment, the rights of the defendant are formally read and a plea is entered.

  • Chatfield Farms provides fresh produce to low-income families

    On a hazy September morning, Chris Krabbenhoeft plucks leaves of spinach until his bucket is full.

    Spinach, berries, onions, peas, green beans — depending on the season, the 1.5-acre garden at the Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms location in Littleton has it all.