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Local News

  • Neighbors oppose development plan at Kipling and Quincy

    A developer’s plan to build nearly 250 apartments near the federal prison at Kipling and Quincy is drawing the ire of local residents.

    About 150 people attended a community meeting April 3 that the developer held as part of the county’s rezoning process, and many raised concerns about increased traffic and spoiled views of the mountains.

  • West Metro appoints fire chief

    Newly appointed Fire Chief Don Lombardi of West Metro Fire Rescue plans to expand the department’s role in non-emergency health care and citizen safety training.

    On Tuesday, April 3, the district board unanimously voted to hire Lombardi as its next chief. Lombardi has been with West Metro for 21 years and had served as interim fire chief since October 2011, when Chief Douglas McBee retired.

    Lombardi grew up in Littleton and attended the University of Colorado, where he earned his bachelor of science degree.

  • Getting the jump on fitness

    E.J. Boillot keeps jumpers hopping twice a week at Ute Meadows Elementary from late September through July and August for two and half hours a day. “It’s pretty much year-round. In an off-World year, guys will be done around the last of June. We wouldn’t go again until September,” Boillot said. “But with this being a World year, they’ll stay jumping, competing, staying in shape until the 8th of August. Then we’ll start again around the 15th of September.”

  • Reverse-911 glitches fixed, county reports

    Glitches in the emergency notification system that caused a number of homes that were supposed to be evacuated during the Lower North Fork Fire to be passed over for reverse-911 calls have now been fixed, a Jefferson County official said.

    Problems with FirstCall Network, the emergency notification company that Jeffco uses, caused fewer than 120 homes in the evacuation area not to receive the evacuation call, according to Jeff Irvin, executive director of the Jefferson County Emergency Communications Authority.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    It’s the thought that counts

  • Man who planted bomb at Southwest Plaza gets life in prison

    Earl Albert Moore received a sentence of life in prison without parole April 5 for planting a homemade bomb inside Southwest Plaza Mall a year ago.

    Federal Judge John L. Kane delivered the maximum possible sentence for the single count of use of a destructive device in relation to a crime of violence, a charge to which Moore, 66, pleaded guilty in December. Kane, who thoroughly chastised Moore during the hearing, explained that the harsh sentence was necessary to protect the public and deliver a message to potential future offenders.

  • Difficult childhood pushes Schliebe to success

    Rick Schliebe recalls walking to school wearing tattered clothing as a boy, a 60-year-old memory he said has motivated him to strive for a successful business life.

    But at age 70, the larger-than-life owner of Club USA, one of the biggest independent health clubs in the metro area, looks back on years building profitable and unique gyms as a life study that has been more social than financial.

  • Response team brings real effort to simulated disaster

    Decked out in yellow hard hats and neon visibility vests, members of Littleton’s Community Emergency Response Team, or CERT, practiced their skills at a simulated smoldering plane crash on Saturday.

    In a scene reminiscent of a movie set, citizen responders assessed the area for safety and counted “victims” in the back lot of Bradford Auto Body as their practical exam in a four-week-long, 32-hour citizen response class.

    The citizens responded to a scenario in which a tornado caused a small plane to crash into the Littleton auto body shop.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Doesn’t respect others’ property

  • White powder discovered in FCI Englewood mailroom

    A hazmat team responded late Monday morning to the Federal Correctional Institution Englewood, the prison near Quincy and U.S. 285, when a routine check of inmate mail revealed an envelope containing white powder.

    West Metro Fire Rescue arrived at the prison shortly after 11 a.m. The mailroom area was “promptly contained” after the discovery, the prison stated in a news release.

    A test of the powder indicated the substance was not hazardous, a prison spokesman said.

    The recipient of the mail was not identified.