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Local News

  • A ‘fracking’ consensus?

    Who would have thought with the emphasis on our state’s new-energy economy that advances in ways to extract oil and natural gas would trigger economic opportunities in the energy industry in Colorado? And yet, that is what is happening as energy companies are preparing to utilize hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to extract energy around Colorado.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Of munchies and misdemeanors

  • Ethics commission’s finding on McCasky delayed

    Colorado’s Independent Ethics Commission on Monday determined that former Jeffco commissioner Kevin McCasky did not violate the state’s gift-ban law when he voted to approve $400,000 in county contributions to his future employer, the Jefferson Economic Council, which was considering his application at the time to become the organization’s executive director.

     

  • Librarians, classroom coaches, assistant principals defend their jobs

    Groups of Jeffco Public Schools employees made their cases before the Board of Education to be spared from budget cuts Feb. 2 at a meeting cut short by last week’s snowstorm.
    Teacher librarians, instructional coaches, assistant principals and others filled more than two hours of public comment with short speeches about the need for their jobs.
    Though board members were slated to discuss for the first time their preferences for $50 million to $60 million in cuts over the next two years, the rapidly approaching storm led the board to postpone discussion to a later meeting.

  • Snowstorm socks South Jeffco

    A snowstorm that began Thursday evening and continued throughout the day Friday, closing schools and government offices and making travel hazardous, finally tapered off Saturday morning.

    The slow-moving storm was accompanied by wind gusts up to 40 mph, limiting visibility and piling drifts high. More than 18 inches of snow had fallen at some locations in South Jeffco.

    Weather closures Friday included Jeffco Public Schools, Jefferson County offices, Jefferson County Public Library locations and Foothills Park & Recreation District facilities.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Suspect is probably not moving

  • New Zambonis bring sour taste

    Two new electric Zamboni ice-resurfacing machines costing the Foothills Park & Recreation District $240,000 have broken down or malfunctioned repeatedly in recent months, leading the board of directors to question whether the unique machines are subject to the state’s lemon law.

    Though the district purchased the new, more energy-efficient machines to much fanfare, the two Zambonis have so far both suffered broken steering mechanisms, programming errors and other mechanic maladies.

  • New Zambonis bring sour taste

    Two new electric Zamboni ice-resurfacing machines costing the Foothills Park & Recreation District $240,000 have broken down or malfunctioned repeatedly in recent months, leading the board of directors to question whether the unique machines are subject to the state’s lemon law.

    Though the district purchased the new, more energy-efficient machines to much fanfare, the two Zambonis have so far both suffered broken steering mechanisms, programming errors and other mechanic maladies.

  • Three seats open in May on Foothills board

    Three of the five director seats on the Foothills Park & Recreation District board are up for election in May, and two of the incumbents have yet to decide if they will run.

    No candidates have yet filed with the district for seats representing Wards 1, 2 or 5, and self-nomination forms are due on March 2. If no candidates come forward, the current board would cancel the May 8 election and appoint new or existing members.

  • School board eyes reserve funds amid budget cutting

    A committee advising the school board about more than $50 million in anticipated budget reductions cautioned the district Jan. 26 about depleting its reserves, as doing so could threaten the district’s “Aa” credit rating.

    In the midst of waning revenue from the state, the school district is bracing for cuts that will likely result in layoffs and increased class sizes, particularly in elementary schools. But to help cushion the reductions, the school board is considering how much, if any, of its $92 million general fund reserves to spend.