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Politics

  • Jeffco’s recall free-for-all spurs call for campaign finance reform

    An ethics watchdog group has called for state campaign finance reform in the wake of the release of contribution figures from the Jeffco school district’s contentious recall election.

    While any change to the Colorado Constitution, which specifies how elections are conducted, would require a statewide vote, Peg Perl, senior counsel for Colorado Ethics Watch, said Colorado legislators can take several steps to bring more transparency to local elections, including:

  • Rosier announces bid for U.S. Senate

    Republican County Commissioner Don Rosier took his first shots at Democratic incumbent Michael Bennet last Thursday as he kicked off a campaign for the U.S. Senate.

  • Voter turnout, winning margins bigger than 2013

    Jeffco voters turned out in greater numbers for the Nov. 3 election than they did in 2013, when the now-ousted conservative school board majority was elected.

    According to the Jefferson County Elections office, 46.4 percent of the county’s 399,918 registered voters cast ballots last week.

    In 2013, when John Newkirk, Ken Witt and Julie Williams were elected, 43.2 percent of voters cast ballots. At the time, the county was home to 412,954 registered voters, the elections database shows.

  • A summary of items on the Jefferson County ballot

    Proposition BB: Marijuana tax revenue question

    The state is proposing Proposition BB, which would allow lawmakers to spend the $66.1 million in taxes collected during the first year that sales of recreational marijuana were legal.

  • Three vying for two two-large seats on Littleton council

    With the makeup of the Littleton City Council in the balance in the Nov. 3 election, the Courier is previewing each of the five races.

    Five of the council’s seven seats are up for election, as residents in Districts 1, 2 and 4 will vote for their representatives, and the city as a whole will decide on two of the three at-large seats.

  • District 1 candidates agree on need for public involvement

    The makeup of the Littleton City Council could change dramatically in the Nov. 3 election.

    Five of the council’s seven seats are up for election. Residents in Districts 1, 2 and 4 will vote for their representatives, and the city as a whole will decide on two of the three at-large seats.

    The Columbine Courier is previewing each race.

     

    District 1

  • Incumbent, citizen activist square off in Littleton City Council race for District 4

    The makeup of the Littleton City Council could change dramatically in the Nov. 3 election.

    Five of the council’s seven seats are up for election. Residents in Districts 1, 2 and 4 will vote for their representatives, and the city as a whole will decide on two of the three at-large seats.

    Over the next several weeks, the Columbine Courier will be previewing each race.

    District 4

  • Neville eyeing bid for U.S. Senate

    Republican state Sen. Tim Neville is "doing a lot of praying and a lot of conversation with those that we know" to decide whether to jump into the race for U.S. Senate.

    Neville, whose Senate district covers Evergreen and Conifer, in addition to part of Littleton, is on a listening tour around the state as he gauges support for a U.S. Senate bid. He said he plans to make a decision in October about whether to challenge Democratic incumbent Michael Bennet.

  • Evergreen attorney challenging DA Weir

    An Evergreen attorney has filed to run as a Democrat and will challenge Jeffco District Attorney Pete Weir, a Republican, in the November 2016 election.

    Jake Lilly, who runs his own criminal defense firm in Lakewood and lives in Evergreen, will be the first Democrat to run for DA since 2004. Weir, who ran unopposed in 2012 and succeeded fellow Republican Scott Storey, has already filed to run for a second term. 

  • Newest council member sees budget as biggest challenge

    Littleton’s newest City Council member is steeling himself for a steep learning curve as he takes office, and Bill Hopping believes the biggest challenge will be balancing the city’s budget.

    “I’m fired up to get going,” Hopping said. “Our biggest challenge is how to balance the budget while providing the services the citizens want and that the town really needs.”