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Today's News

  • At midnight, renewed hope

    A solitary candle lit the altar in the darkened church as members of the congregation silently filled the pews. A Bible reading was the only sound in the meaningful minutes before midnight.

    At the stroke of 12, the worshipers at St. Herman Orthodox Christian Church in Littleton began lighting candles, until the gathering was bathed in a soft illumination that sent the signal message: Christ is risen.

  • Commissioner Szabo opts to drive new county-owned vehicle

    County Commissioner Libby Szabo is driving a new county vehicle purchased specifically for her.

    County policy allows elected officials to use a county-provided vehicle or to receive reimbursement for mileage on a personal vehicle. Szabo chose a new Ford Taurus, at a cost of $40,000. Commissioners Casey Tighe and Don Rosier use their personal vehicles and are reimbursed for mileage.

  • Student demonstration calls attention to modern slavery

    Students from Front Range Christian School took part last week in an international effort to draw attention to the plight of those suffering under forced labor and slavery.

    Students from the school stood at South Santa Fe Drive and West Bowles Avenue throughout the day April 10 as part of the International Justice Mission’s Stand Up for Freedom Day.

  • RTD’s proposed fare increase finds opposition in South Jeffco

    A plan by the Regional Transportation District to increase fares and eliminate transfers continues to elicit protests, including opposition from South Jeffco commuters.

    At a public meeting April 8 at the Ken Caryl Ranch House, a handful of area residents criticized RTD’s proposed new fee structure, with several attendees expressing concern about the elimination of transfers and how that would affect low-income riders.

    Meanwhile, at a meeting in Denver on the same day, more than 100 people protested the planned changes, according to media reports.

  • Local theater staging fund-raiser for nonprofit

    Theatergoers have a chance to support a local nonprofit while enjoying some memorable oldies from the ’50s and ’60s.

    Littleton’s Town Hall Arts Center again has teamed with TLC Meals on Wheels for a night of fund-raising on April 21. The evening, which raises funds for TLC, features cocktails, a raffle and a special performance of the center’s current production, “The Marvelous Wonderettes.”

  • RTD’s drive for federal funding rolls through Littleton

    Users of public transit are being asked to stand up if they want to keep their seats on the bus.

    RTD parked its “Signature Bus” in downtown Littleton on Saturday to raise awareness of the need for long-term federal funding of public transit. Supporters signed the sides of the bus, which will take part in the Stand Up for Transportation Day parade in Denver on Thursday.

  • Victim identified in fire death

    Littleton police have identified the man who died in a fire on Monday.

    Roger Alan Conklin, 52, was found on fire in the backyard of a home in the 500 block of West Crestline Circle, just southeast of Cornerstone Park. Police are investigating the incident but said in a news release that the death did not appear to be related to a crime.

  • Lobato family contemplating legal action

    The family of Jennifer Lobato, the prisoner who died in the Jeffco jail while awaiting medical attention, will wait for the completion of an investigation before deciding whether to take legal action.

    David Lane, the lawyer representing the Lobato family, said the family has been in contact with the Sheriff’s Office about the investigation and will wait until a coroner’s report is complete before deciding on their next step.

  • Jeffco schools could receive less money from state

    Proposed cuts by lawmakers in the K-12 portion of Gov. John Hickenlooper’s 2015-16 state budget could mean that Jeffco Public Schools receives $17.5 million less than anticipated.

    Hickenlooper’s funding plan would have provided the district $37 million in state funds; $17.2 million of that would have gone toward ongoing costs, while $19.8 million would have been earmarked for one-time expenditures.

  • Panelists ponder coverage of racial issues

    • Was an NAACP office in Colorado Springs actually the target of a homemade bomb that was detonated in January, or was the explosion meant for a nearby tax preparer’s office?

    • Why was 5-year-old JonBenet Ramsey’s murder in 1996 covered in so much more detail than the rape and murder of a 9-year-old black girl two weeks later in a Chicago housing project?